Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 25, 2018 


President Trump loses another round in court on immigrant “dreamers.” Also on today’s rundown: Environmentalists tell New York Gov. Cuomo to match words with action; California lawmakers wear jeans, taking a stand against sexual violence; and Airbnb is called out for “secret tax deals.”

Daily Newscasts

Granite State Could Shine Light on Money-in-Politics Debate

As New Hampshire voters make their final choices for the primary, two of the state's former members of Congress are speaking out about the influence of money in politics. (Phil Roeder/Flickr)
As New Hampshire voters make their final choices for the primary, two of the state's former members of Congress are speaking out about the influence of money in politics. (Phil Roeder/Flickr)
February 3, 2016

CONCORD, N.H. - With the nation now focused on the final days of the Granite State primary battle, some former politicians are speaking out about the need to curb the influence of money in politics.

Former Republican Rep. Charles Bass said polls show 85 percent of voters from both parties think money has too great an influence on elections. Bass spent 14 years representing New Hampshire and, like most who served with him, he now bemoans how much of his time was spent in the never-ending task of raising campaign money.

"We need to have a new system," he said, "not necessarily public financing, but transparency and a legislative agenda where the people force elected officials to deal with the influence of money on both sides of the aisle."

Bass said the long tradition that forces candidates to campaign door-to-door in the Granite State is healthy for the process and needs to be preserved. If presidential campaigns are allowed to be decided on a purely national stage, he said, it would greatly increase the influence of money in politics.

Bass and former Ambassador and Democratic Congressman Richard Swett are members of the Issue One ReFormers Caucus, a bipartisan group working for campaign finance reform. Swett said Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders are running very different style presidential campaigns, but their methods of financing are sending a powerful message to the other candidates.

"They are not in the same positions of either being so independently wealthy that they can buy the campaign themselves, or that they have a small-contribution appeal - broad enough that enables them to afford the campaign," Swett said. "I think we're going to see significant change after this election, no matter who gets elected."

For that change to happen, members of the Issue One ReFormers group say, a plan must be ready to launch right after the election, in a new session of Congress, so that it will have a chance to be acted on before politicians have to turn their attention back to raising money.

More information on the bipartisan group is online at issueone.org.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NH