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Clean Power Plan "Gives NH Credit" Where Credit is Due

One of the state's top lawyers says the Granite State already is getting plenty of power from renewable sources, and that's why the state would gain if the D.C. Circuit upholds the EPA's Clean Power Plan. (Ceinturion)
One of the state's top lawyers says the Granite State already is getting plenty of power from renewable sources, and that's why the state would gain if the D.C. Circuit upholds the EPA's Clean Power Plan. (Ceinturion)
April 4, 2016

CONCORD, N.H. - The Granite State has a major stake in a pending lawsuit that challenges the Clean Power Plan, and a key lawyer at the Office of the Attorney General says New Hampshire deserves to get credit where credit is due.

The EPA's plan to reduce carbon emissions is being challenged by 27 states as well as some in the power industry.

Allen Brooks, chief of the environmental bureau at the New Hampshire state Attorney General's office, says the Granite State has plenty to gain if the courts uphold the legality of the plan.

"The Clean Power Plan is specifically important," says Brooks. "Because it will allow New Hampshire, that's already taken steps to reduce CO'2 and greenhouse-gas emissions within the state, within the region to get some credit for what we have already done and to reduce nationwide levels of GHGs."

GHG stands for greenhouse gases. The EPA estimates the Clean Power Plan would provide up to $54 billion a year in climate and health benefits by 2030.

On Friday, a broad coalition of health, faith and business leaders filed an amicus brief in support of the plan.

When it comes to health issues, Janice Nolen, assistant vice president for national policy with the American Lung Association, says meeting the goals would do more than simply reduce carbon emissions.

"Cleaning up these power plants also will reduce other pollutants that we've been trying to get a handle on for years that can worsen human health and shorten lives," says Nolen.

On the business side, U.S. Black Chambers CEO Ron Busby says this issue goes beyond the usual corporate focus on earning the most profit.

"This is the only Earth that we have," says Busby. "And we want to make sure that our children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren have the same opportunity to be able to have a good lifestyle here."

The case comes up for oral arguments on June 2 at the D.C. Circuit.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NH