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The Keystone oil pipeline spills big time in South Dakota; a look at the GOP tax plan and it’s impact on the most vulnerable Americans; and renewed hope for Maine’s Katahdin Woods and Waters national monument.

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Idahoans Stand Up for the Benefits of Science

Marchers are gathering in several Idaho cities on Saturday, along with counterparts across the nation, to show their support for science. (Martha Soukup/Flickr)
Marchers are gathering in several Idaho cities on Saturday, along with counterparts across the nation, to show their support for science. (Martha Soukup/Flickr)
April 21, 2017

BOISE, Idaho - Marchers in cities big and small across the nation this Saturday say the evidence is clear: It's time to stand up for science.

Although organizers of the March for Science are trying to steer the marches away from politics, many in the scientific community are concerned about the new administration's denial of evidence for man's role in climate change and its silencing of federal scientists and national park employees.

The main march is in Washington, D.C., and several smaller, sister marches will be held in Idaho. Austin Hopkins with the Idaho Conservation League is helping to organize the local events.

"Science has become so pervasive in our lives, and the benefit that it provides us that people don't always recognize how necessary it is," said Hopkins, "Whether it's letting us know what medication is safe to take, or providing us clean air and clean water, or why we should drive certain vehicles that are safe versus others that are not so safe."

Marches are planned for Boise, Idaho Falls, Pocatello and the Moscow-Pullman area. Many will include family-friendly activities, such as science fairs to promote the importance of science. The marches also coincide with Earth Day.

Emily Forsberg from Moscow is helping organize the central Idaho march with their Washington neighbors in Pullman. She says events like these are needed to show support for science and the critical role it plays in people's lives.

"We want to uphold the common good for political leaders and policymakers, and we want to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest," she said.

The National March for Science website also says the march is not political. It notes a nationwide trend toward discrediting scientific consensus and asks, "Can we afford not to speak out in [science's] defense?"


Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID