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What's next following the FCC vote to end net neutrality? We have a pair of reports. Also on our Friday rundown: We'll let you know why adolescents in foster care need opportunities to thrive; and steps you can take to avoid losing your holiday loot.

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MO School Attended By Carver Getting Restoration Funds

"Selfishness and self are at the bottom of a lot of troubles in the world. So many people fail to realize that serving God and one's fellow men are the only worthwhile things in life. It is service that counts." -- George Washington Carver. (Carver Birthplace Association)
"Selfishness and self are at the bottom of a lot of troubles in the world. So many people fail to realize that serving God and one's fellow men are the only worthwhile things in life. It is service that counts." -- George Washington Carver. (Carver Birthplace Association)
September 19, 2017

NEOSHO, Mo. – Born a slave and then orphaned, George Washington Carver was among the unlikeliest of people to grow into a world-famous scholar, inventor and botanist. But that's exactly what Carver became, and it began as a 10-year-old attending what was then called The Neosho Colored School in southwest Missouri.

An array of dignitaries will pay tribute to Carver's legacy this Thursday as they present the 2017 George Washington Carver Distinguished Service and Innovation Award at an event in at an event in Des Moines, Iowa. Monies raised from the dinner will help restore the Neosho schoolhouse where Carver got his start.

Carver scholar Paxton Williams says it was a combination of Carver's perseverance and the unbiased support of some select individuals that led to his success.

"And so the traits both of Carver and of those individuals are the traits that we're trying to promote and encourage and honor," he says.

Ambassador Kenneth M. Quinn, president of the World Food Prize Foundation, and Dr. Simon Estes, internationally renowned opera singer and humanitarian, will receive the Carver award Thursday evening. Williams says he hopes people walk away from the dinner with an understanding that, even in the 1880s and '90s, there were people that, as he says, "got it right" and saw the benefits of kindness and inclusion.

Williams also says the event is intended to be much more than a history lesson.

"There might be other Carvers out there, as well, who might need that same sort of inspiration, that same sort of encouragement," he adds.

The Neosho schoolhouse is being restored to serve as a historic monument to Carver and every African-American who sought education there in the decades following the Civil War.

Kevin Patrick Allen, Public News Service - MO