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PNS Daily Newscast - December 11, 2017 


Families across the nation are still waiting for children's health insurance funding; also on our nationwide rundown, Aztec High School in New Mexico remains closed following a deadly shooting; plus a look at how politics figure into most companies' marketing strategies.

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"Dreamers" to Risk Arrest in Push for Congress to Act on Immigration

Colorado could lose nearly $3 billion in gross domestic product and $768 million in lost tax revenues over the next decade if DACA ends, according to research by the Cato Institute. (Getty Images)
Colorado could lose nearly $3 billion in gross domestic product and $768 million in lost tax revenues over the next decade if DACA ends, according to research by the Cato Institute. (Getty Images)
December 6, 2017

DENVER – Some 15,000 undocumented immigrants and supporters, including more than 20 from Colorado, are in Washington Wednesday to urge Congress to pass the Dream Act.

Pamela Resendiz Trujano, deputy director of the group United for a New Economy, says immigration agents are picking up young people who would qualify for Dream Act protections, and, she adds, every day Congress delays, more people are in danger of being deported.

"The action in D.C. is supposed to be the largest civil disobedience in immigrants' rights history, which I feel just amplifies the fact that people are willing to risk arrest and push Congress to take action, because the moment for this to happen is now," she states.

Resendiz Trujano is undocumented, but is one of a select group currently protected under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

President Donald Trump decided in September to end DACA, and the program is set to expire in March unless Congress takes action.

Some Republicans and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions argue that DACA, created by President Barack Obama, was executive overreach because only Congress has the authority to pass immigration laws.

There are more than 16,000 people living in Colorado currently protected under DACA.

Colorado stands to lose nearly $3 billion in total gross domestic product in the next decade if DACA ends, according to research by the Cato Institute, and the move would drain nearly $770 million from the state's coffers in lost tax revenues.

Trujano says in addition to the economic impacts, families across the nation would be at risk of being separated.

"When you're undocumented, when you're not a citizen, you do not qualify for any federal benefits,” she points out. “So we're really actually contributing to the economy by paying taxes."

In order to qualify for DACA, residents who came to the U.S. as children have to prove they have a high school diploma or a GED, or have been honorably discharged from the military, and must have no criminal record.

Wednesday’s actions also are meant to call on Congress to clear the way to permanent residency for people living in the country under Temporary Protected Status.


Eric Galatas, Public News Service - CO