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PNS Daily Newscast - January 17, 2018 


As the DOJ tries a rare direct appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court on DACA, a new report says border patrol agents have been vandalizing water left for migrants; also, on today's rundown a labor dispute in Minnesota could affect Super Bowl week; and the Interior decision nears on sage-grouse plans.

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Nevada Braces for Federal Marijuana Crackdown

Dozens of states where voters have legalized either medicinal or recreational marijuana could now be targeted for federal enforcement. (growweedeasy/Morguefile)
Dozens of states where voters have legalized either medicinal or recreational marijuana could now be targeted for federal enforcement. (growweedeasy/Morguefile)
January 5, 2018

CARSON CITY, Nev. – Supporters of legal, recreational marijuana use are speaking out against an announcement Thursday by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions that clears the way for federal raids and prosecution of growers, distributors and sellers.

Sessions is rescinding the Obama-era policy of federal non-interference with states such as Nevada, California, Colorado and others where voters have opted to legalize marijuana use and sales.

State Sen. Tick Segerblom thinks the fledgling marijuana industry in the Silver State should not come under attack.

"We've invested hundreds of millions of dollars," he says. "We're anticipating and have budgeted for about $150 million in taxes, got almost 7,000 employees - so if all that shuts down, that's huge. Not good."

It will now be up to the U.S. attorneys in each state whether to bust the retail shops that have sprung up since Nevadans passed Question Two in 2016.

On Wednesday, Sessions also announced that Dayle Elieson, an assistant U.S. Attorney from Dallas, will replace Nevada's acting U.S. Attorney Steven Myhre, effective today. Segerblom says it is unclear what her approach will be.

Morgan Fox, director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project, says Sessions is out of step with most of the country on this issue.

"His own department recommended in August that the policy of non-interference stay in place," he explains. "The president has long said that this should be a states'-rights issue, and he's out of step with the American people, nearly two-thirds of which think that marijuana should be legal for adults."

Nevadans have spent an estimated $126 million at retail marijuana shops since they opened four months ago. Six states have voted to legalize recreational use, and more than a dozen now allow medical marijuana use.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - NV