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PNS Daily News - May 29, 2017 


We’re covering a variety of issues in today’s news including: Germany’s leader notes a disconnect with the United States; remembering the fallen and those left behind on a Memorial Day; and a look at passenger’s rights as summer air travel season kicks into gear.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - AR: Environment

Poultry processing is a $4 billion a year industry in Arkansas, employing more than 40,000 people. (nd3000/iStockphoto)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- A coalition of environmental and animal rights groups is asking for a moratorium on constructing new chicken processing farms in northeast Arkansas. The Animal Legal Defense Fund, the Arkansas Rights Koalition and the Center for Biological Diversity are among the groups asking

Participants at the first Arkansas Environmental Policy Summit will discuss managing and preserving the state’s natural resources, such as Hot Springs National Park. (zrfphoto/iStockphoto)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Environmental advocates and public officials are meeting today at the first Arkansas Environmental Policy Summit, to examine the state's critical ecological issues. The goal of the summit is to tackle some of the public-policy questions about the environment that are sure t

The Upper Buffalo Wilderness Area is among the public lands to be protected from air pollution by the EPA’s Arkansas Regional Haze Plan. (National Park Service)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – It took a lawsuit by an environmental group to get it done, but the Environmental Protection Agency has finally released clean air regulations for public lands in Arkansas. The Arkansas Regional Haze Plan is designed to clear the air pollution in the Caney Creek and Upper

A couple of groups have come forward in opposition to six large broiler chicken houses proposed for the Strawberry River Watershed. (univar.edu)

EVENING SHADE, Ark. – A lawsuit could be filed before summer wraps up over plans to build a new poultry plant in Northeast Arkansas. The Animal Legal Defense Fund and the Arkansas Rights Koalition (ARK) have sent a letter to the Farm Service Agency, the Small Business Administration and the

Harmful blue-green algae is increasing in bodies of water across the country because of climate change, farming practices and storm and wastewater runoff. (USGS)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Algal blooms in bodies of water across the nation are increasing as a result of climate change, farming practices, storm and wastewater runoff and other environmental issues. They're naturally occurring, but produce toxins that get into the air, water or food, and can cau

Washing your vehicle at home uses more than 100 gallons of water on average. (Virginia Carter)

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. - How many times have you driven through your neighborhood and noticed people out washing their cars in the driveway? The scene is depicted on television shows and at the movies too, but there's an effort under way to stop that practice. Jane Maginot, urban stormwater educato

Kids may need to get a pet and spend more time playing outdoors to protect themselves against allergies. (Mike Baca)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - All the runny noses and itchy eyes tell us it's allergy season in Arkansas. From April to June, grass pollen causes problems for many, then, come fall it will be ragweed and other plants shedding pollen that cause misery. If it seems like more people have allergies than ever,

The Ozarks are providing researchers a good mix of conifer and deciduous trees to study the effects of warming temperatures on forests. Here, they're checking a white oak. (Columbia University Earth Institute)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - A crew of scientists from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has been making its way through the Ozark Mountains, dodging snakes and poison ivy to study tree rings, to see how they're reacting to climate change. In much of North America, research has shown

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