Newscasts

Updated PNS Daily Newscast - September, 22 2017 


The news we're following on today's rundown: Facebook turns over Russia-linked ads to Congress; how Senate Republicans’ new health-care bill could hurt the fight against the opioid epidemic; and Texas food banks prepare to serve the long-term needs of Harvey victims.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - AR: Climate Change/Air Quality

Poultry processing is a $4 billion a year industry in Arkansas, employing more than 40,000 people. (nd3000/iStockphoto)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- A coalition of environmental and animal rights groups is asking for a moratorium on constructing new chicken processing farms in northeast Arkansas. The Animal Legal Defense Fund, the Arkansas Rights Koalition and the Center for Biological Diversity are among the groups asking

Participants at the first Arkansas Environmental Policy Summit will discuss managing and preserving the state’s natural resources, such as Hot Springs National Park. (zrfphoto/iStockphoto)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Environmental advocates and public officials are meeting today at the first Arkansas Environmental Policy Summit, to examine the state's critical ecological issues. The goal of the summit is to tackle some of the public-policy questions about the environment that are sure t

The Upper Buffalo Wilderness Area is among the public lands to be protected from air pollution by the EPA’s Arkansas Regional Haze Plan. (National Park Service)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – It took a lawsuit by an environmental group to get it done, but the Environmental Protection Agency has finally released clean air regulations for public lands in Arkansas. The Arkansas Regional Haze Plan is designed to clear the air pollution in the Caney Creek and Upper

Kids may need to get a pet and spend more time playing outdoors to protect themselves against allergies. (Mike Baca)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - All the runny noses and itchy eyes tell us it's allergy season in Arkansas. From April to June, grass pollen causes problems for many, then, come fall it will be ragweed and other plants shedding pollen that cause misery. If it seems like more people have allergies than ever,

The Ozarks are providing researchers a good mix of conifer and deciduous trees to study the effects of warming temperatures on forests. Here, they're checking a white oak. (Columbia University Earth Institute)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - A crew of scientists from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has been making its way through the Ozark Mountains, dodging snakes and poison ivy to study tree rings, to see how they're reacting to climate change. In much of North America, research has shown

PHOTO: Jon Gensler, who was a U.S. Army tank captain in Iraq, says he became concerned about climate change after seeing how America's energy policy was tied to the deaths of two West Point classmates there. Photo courtesy of Gensler.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - Advisers to the armed forces are objecting to a vote by the U.S. House of Representatives to stop the military from planning for climate change. The Department of Defense sees climate change as a serious threat to national security. Last month, however, the House added an amendm

Walmart is installing solar power generating systems in several locations in California and Arizona. The majority of these sites will utilize thin film panels as seen on this Mountain View, Calif. store.  Image courtesy of Walmart

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - It isn't often that the Sierra Club and Walmart are on the same side of an environmental issue, but that is the case with President Obama's announcement to step up the nation's fight against carbon pollution and address climate change. Some Arkansas congressmen who disagree with

PHOTO: When the Sierra Club and Audubon Arkansas settled with SouthWest Power over construction of a coal fired power plant, eight million dollars was directed to The Nature Conservancy for the purchase and preservation of lands. The first tract from with that funding, the Terra Noire Preserve, is dedicated today. CREDIT: TNC of Arkansas

ARKADELPHIA, Ark. – There is not much native prairie left in Arkansas, but a new tract to come under protection is being opened to the public today near Arkadelphia. The 360 acres will be part of the larger Terre Noire Conservation Area. The protection of these Blackland Prairies is vital, sa

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