Newscasts

PNS Weekend Newscast - September 23rd, 2017 


Here's a look at what we're covering: Senator John McCain says no to the GOP's health care plan, a new survey takes a look at how residents in one state feel about the effort to real Obamacare, and International Day of Peace is being celebrated this weekend.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - AR: Welfare Reform

One group is demanding that presidential candidates make their positions on preserving Social Security known before the March 1 primary election. (AARP Arkansas)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - Presidential candidates will soon be campaigning in Arkansas prior to the March 1 primary election. AARP Arkansas has launched an accountability campaign called Take A Stand, demanding the candidates present their plans on how to update Social Security for future generations. C

PHOTO: About 45 percent of SNAP recipients in Arkansas are children. Photo credit: Barb Kampbell, Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - A vote is expected today in the U.S. House on a bill that would cut $40 billion over the next 10 years from federal food assistance programs. For Arkansas, it is a vote that hunger relief groups have dreaded. More than 500,000 Arkansans receive SNAP (food stamp) benefits, which

A cut in SNAP benefits this fall will reduce food subsides for Arkansas' low-wage families, according to the state's food banks. PHOTO of a mobile SNAP enrollment truck courtesy of Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - A cut in food stamps coming this fall is expected to land especially hard on Arkansas's working poor. A temporary boost to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) enacted to stimulate the economy is set to expire in ten weeks. Critics charge that food stamps are to

PHOTO: Piggy banks and coin jars aren't getting much attention in Arkansas homes. A new CFED report says 52 percent of Arkansans don't have emergency savings to last three months.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - More than half of Arkansas residents do not have enough savings to keep them afloat for three months in case of a job loss or other costly emergency - and even those at higher incomes are not immune. That's one finding of a new report that makes recommendations about what states

PHOTO: Many of the working poor in Arkansas have jobs in retail, food service or as maids. The Working Poor Families Project says 41 percent of the state's working families are still considered low-income. Courtesy of We Are All One World.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - It isn't making headlines at the State Legislature yet, but Medicaid could be the topic most talked about behind the scenes there. Lawmakers will soon decide whether Arkansas expands its Medicaid coverage as part of the Affordable Care Act. In a state where 40 percent of workin

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