Newscasts

PNS Daily News - September 25, 2017 


Here’s a look at what we’re highlighting: new travel restrictions announced for eight countries; research highlights a drop in uninsured kids; and weekend protests over the House Speaker’s tax plan.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CA: Criminal Justice

Before Sacramento County repealed its fees, the average juvenile probation case could generate $5,640 in fees, according to a new report. (JDAI AZ)

BERKELEY, Calif. – A new report finds that some California families are losing their homes and being driven into bankruptcy by the fees counties charge when kids get arrested - fees that nonetheless generate little to no profit for taxpayers. Researchers from the UC Berkeley School of Law fo

More than 70 percent of children recommended for prosecution in California are African-American or Latino, which exposes them to what some call the

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – A bill to keep children under 12 out of the juvenile court system gets a hearing before the state Senate Public Safety Committee today. SB 439 would instead require that children 11 or younger be referred to child protective services and thus be spared time in juvenile ha

A new report says the state overuses suspensions for high schoolers, leading to more dropouts. (Darnok/Morguefile)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – California could save billions of dollars by reducing the number of high school suspensions and favoring rehabilitation over punishment, according to a new study by the California Dropout Research Project. Researchers followed more than 100 randomly chosen 10th graders

Rights4girls says one of the main predictors of entry into the juvenile justice system is sexual abuse; a new law seeks to change those odds by keeping some kids out of jail. (Jose Pereira)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – This week, a new state law is in effect aimed at protecting children who are victims of sexual abuse. Law enforcement officers in California no longer can arrest youth suspects for prostitution. Maheen Kaleem, a staff attorney with Rights4Girls, which advocated for the

Law enforcement officers in California soon will have to record the racial identity of people they stop as part of the state's efforts to curb racial profiling. (Bluegame/iStockphoto)

LOS ANGELES - In a week where news of police shootings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota has filled the airwaves, California is taking concrete steps to fight racial profiling - with the first meeting of the new Racial and Identity Profiling Advisory Board today in Los Angeles. The board was

A new law requires California doctors to have access to the state's database that tracks prescriptions for opioid painkillers.(dodgerton skillhause/morguefile)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Starting today, all doctors in California must be registered for access to the state's prescription database. It's part of an effort to stop drug-addicted patients from "doctor shopping" to get pain pills. The Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System,

A new study shows that the practice of charging youth as adults varies widely across the state. (Youth Justice Coalition)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- The practice of "direct file," in which a prosecutor decides to file adult criminal charges against a youth, varies widely by county and disproportionately affects young people of color, according to

The L.A. City Council voted Wednesday to have L.A.P.D. work with a nonprofit to identify shady gun dealers. (Rich Legg/iStockphoto)

LOS ANGELES - On Wednesday, a day when a murder-suicide shooting shut down UCLA, and one day before National Gun Violence Awareness Day, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to have LAPD work with a nonprofit to identify "bad apple" gun dealers who sell the majority of guns used in crimes.

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