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PNS Daily Newscast - October 19, 2017 


Attorney General Sessions tight-lipped before the Senate Judiciary Committee; a new report says bith-control access is critical for both health and economic security; and expect a personal touch to finances as today marks Credit Union Day.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Housing/Homelessness

Residents of Westminster, Colo., are asking the city to consider creating an affordable-housing trust fund to help struggling families stay in their homes. (Getty Images)

WESTMINSTER, Co. – We Organize Westminster, or WOW, has a public assembly Saturday to address what the group is calling a housing and renters' rights crisis in the Denver suburb. In the five years, Inez Marquez has lived at the Copperwood Apartments, she says the rent for the one-bedroom uni

Residents of Denver's Westwood neighborhood, including Santiago Jaramillo, are working to raise awareness about climate change in the community. (Joe Mahoney/The Colorado Trust)

DENVER – If climate pollution continues at current levels, Denver could see more than a month of 100-plus degree days by 2050 in the worst years, according to analysis from the city and county of Denver. Elizabeth Babcock, the manager of air, water and climate with the city's Department of E

There are 5,116 people experiencing homelessness in the Denver metro area, including 1,500 families with children and more than 500 veterans. (Getty Images)

WESTMINSTER, Colo. – Housing advocates in Westminster have confronted their City Council on the one-year anniversary of the city's "Coming Home Day" proclamation, where officials promised to prioritize affordable housing. One resident testified that after seeing her rent double over five yea

Community health centers in Colorado - which provide medical, dental and mental-health care regardless of a person's ability to pay - are helping reduce health-care costs. (Pixabay)

DENVER - President Donald Trump's proposed budget includes cutting more than $800 billion from Medicaid, and some Colorado health officials are concerned the move could reverse progress made by a pilot program that has managed to improve health outcomes and cut costs. Ross Brooks, chief executive o

Colorado's report card for delivering food stamps to struggling families is in, and there's good news but room for improvements. (Pixabay)

DENVER – More Colorado families who qualify for food stamps, the program known federally as SNAP, are getting assistance. That's according to new data compiled by Hunger Free Colorado. But, the state still ranks 45th nationally, and some 350,000 Coloradans are not getting help. Kathy Under

Transgender Coloradans say housing discrimination persists. (Dcsliminky/iStockphoto)

DENVER – It's been eight years since transgender people were added to Colorado's anti-discrimination laws, but many in Denver's transgender community say they're still experiencing housing and other forms of discrimination. Sable Schultz, program manager of the GLBT Community Center of Color

Ignacio Alvarado, a former sheep herder, advocates on behalf of Colorado's migrant workers. (Joe Mahoney)

DENVER – Each year, some 300 men, mostly from South America, are recruited for work virtually no American wants to do: tending to sheep and other livestock around the clock on Colorado's ranches and rangelands. Ignacio Alvarado came to the United States from Chile on a special H-2A visa in t

Colorado's more affluent, ski-resort counties are falling short in connecting eligible lower-income residents to food-assistance programs. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Ski-resort counties with some of the highest income levels per capita in the state are falling short when it comes to connecting their eligible, lower-income residents to food assistance programs. That's according to new research by the group Hunger Free Colorado. Eagle, Pitkin, Routt

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