Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 26, 2017 


Here's what we're following on today's rundown: a federal appeals court will not reinstate Trump’s revised travel ban; a shake up at the USDA could hurt rural America; and the body slamming of a reporter in Montana may be part of a bigger pattern of hostility toward journalists.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Mental Health

In 2015, 33,000 lives were lost due to opioids in the United States, and community health centers are exploring alternative treatments. (Getty Images)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo. – Colorado's community health centers are going back in time to help blunt what has been called an opioid epidemic. Ken Davis, a physician assistant at Northwest Colorado Health in Steamboat Springs, says 15 years ago, health providers used an interdisciplinary approa

New reports show some rulings by President Trump's Supreme Court nominee have allowed schools to use force against and to isolate students with disabilities. (Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER – According to two new reports, Judge Neil Gorsuch – President Donald Trump's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court – has repeatedly failed to protect the rights of students with disabilities. Gorsuch is set to testify before the U.S. Senate Monday. National Education Assoc

Colorado lawmakers may ban a practice, widely considered harmful to minors, that seeks to change a person’s sexual orientation or suppress gender identity. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado lawmakers will consider a bill this week that would prohibit mental-health professionals licensed in Colorado from conducting so-called "conversion" or "reparative" therapy, a practice aimed at changing a person's sexual orientation or suppressing gender identity, with minors

Transgender Coloradans say housing discrimination persists. (Dcsliminky/iStockphoto)

DENVER – It's been eight years since transgender people were added to Colorado's anti-discrimination laws, but many in Denver's transgender community say they're still experiencing housing and other forms of discrimination. Sable Schultz, program manager of the GLBT Community Center of Color

North High School students in Denver demonstrate against the school-to-prison pipeline during the Dignity in Schools 2015 Week of Action. (Padres & Jóvenes Unidos)

LEADVILLE, CO – A school district in rural Colorado is shifting its approach to student discipline in an effort to keep more kids in school and out of trouble - part of a growing trend away from '90s-era zero-tolerance policies that fed a rise in what's been called the school-to-prison pipelin

Colorado health groups are crying foul over claims made by opponents of Amendment 72. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Coloradans are enduring the typical onslaught of political advertising this election season, and many are familiar with arguments against Amendment 72, a proposal to increase cigarette taxes. Altria, Phillip Morris' parent company, has invested more than $17 million in the group "No o

One in four people nationally has a mental health or substance-use disorder. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- Two measures on the November ballot could affect how Colorado delivers behavioral and mental health care to residents across the state. Amendment 72 would increase the tax on a pack of cigarettes by $1.75 statewide to fund health programs, research and training. And Larimer County voters

Heading back to school means being bullied for 25 percent of teens in the United States. (iStockphoto/Helder Almeida)

DENVER - Heading back to school means being bullied for 25 percent of teens, in the United States. Nine out of ten LGBT students say they've experienced harassment at school and online, and one in five kids admit to doing "some bullying." Deborah Sandella, a Denver-based psychotherapist and autho

1 of 7 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »