Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2018  


New Medicaid work requirements could leave many without coverage; we get perspective from Utah. Also on the rundown: a look at the impact of the Trump administrations efforts to erase references to climate change; and Reading Partners Baltimore inspires struggling readers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Senior Issues

Out of pocket costs for prescription drugs, dentures, hearing aids and more are counted as deductible medical expenses for seniors and people with disabilities in Colorado. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Nearly one in five senior citizens in Colorado is turning a portion of his or her medical expenses into extra groceries. Jack Regenbogen, an attorney and policy advocate with the Colorado Center on Law and Policy, points to new data that shows one year after the state rolled out a

Consumer advocates warn that tax breaks that primarily benefit corporations and the top one percent of earners could lead to cuts to Medicare and Medicaid. (Getty Images)

DENVER – As Republicans work to bridge divides between the House and Senate versions of their new tax legislation, consumer advocates are warning that the measure could have significant health consequences. By removing the Affordable Care Act's mandate for all people to buy health insurance,

More than half of Coloradans surveyed in a consumer protection report have experienced fraudulent charges on their credit or debit cards. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Consumer fraud can affect Coloradans of all ages and backgrounds, according to a new report by the AARP Foundation. The group asked Centennial State residents ages 50 and above about their experiences with a variety of scams, and found a clear majority had been targeted. Mark Fett

Hospice care can help patients and families dealing with distressing physical and mental symptoms at the end of life. (Pixabay)

DENVER - More than 40 percent of Medicare patients received just 14 days or less of hospice care in 2015, according to new data. People facing terminal illnesses frequently turn to hospice care, a combination of medical experts, pain management and emotional and spiritual support tailored to each p

In 2016, 235,000 SNAP recipients were Colorado children. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Groups that advocate for children, the elderly and people with disabilities are rolling up their sleeves in the wake of the budget passed last week in the U.S. House of Representatives. The measure includes $150 billion in cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

AARP Colorado holds a town hall meeting at the Evans Community Center, 1100 37th St., from 1 to 3  p.m. on Tuesday. (City of Evans)

DENVER – AARP Colorado is on the road for its statewide Get in the Know Tour to find out what older Coloradans think about the current political climate, and to give updates on upcoming legislation. Kelli Fritts, director of advocacy for AARP Colorado, says the issue weighing heaviest on peo

Scott Bookman with Uncompahgre Medical Center in Norwood says connectivity issues can slow transmission of medical images such as x-rays to remote radiologists, hampering diagnosis and care for patients. (David Cornwell)

DENVER – Colorado leaders are doubling down on efforts to make sure all parts of the state have high-speed access to the Internet. Tony Neal-Graves, executive director of the Broadband Office for the Governor's Office of Information Technology, says government has a role to play getting all

New research shows a majority of Coloradans realize climate change is happening, but fewer understand the potential health impacts. (George Frey/Getty Images)

DENVER – Public health experts in Colorado are narrowing in on the effects of climate change on human health. And they're warning that people who work outdoors, low-income families, seniors and children are among those who will bear the brunt of rising temperatures. Rosemary Rochford, a prof

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