Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 18, 2017 


Featured on our nationwide rundown; President Trump’s reported comments to a grieving military widow raising some eyebrows; we’ve got a breakdown on the impact of “Trumpcare” in states like Colorado; and a look back 50 years at Dow Chemical protests that turned violent in Wisconsin.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Social Justice

Many seasonal jobs at Colorado ski resorts don't provide health coverage, and premiums can top $1,000 a month for high-deductible plans. (Getty Images)

DENVER -- In 2011, 16 percent of Colorado residents did not have health insurance, but by 2015 - after the rollout of the Affordable Care Act - that rate had dropped to just over 6 percent and is holding steady. That's according to the 2017 Colorado Health Access Survey. Michele Lueck, executive d

Coal-fired power plants are the nation's top source of CO2 emissions. Burning coal also is a leading cause of smog, acid rain and toxic air pollution. (Getty Images)

DENVER - The Trump administration on Tuesday took steps to repeal the Clean Power Plan, the nation's first-ever attempt to limit carbon pollution from existing power plants. Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt has claimed the move will correct what he sees as an executive overreach o

Coloradans with incomes of at least $1 million a year will get an average tax cut of $170,000 under the GOP's tax plan. (Pixabay)

DENVER – The top 1 percent of taxpayers are set to get big tax cuts under the Republican tax proposal, but middle and upper middle income earners in Colorado will end up paying more, according to a new 50-state analysis by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Ali Mickelson, directo

Residents of Denver's Westwood neighborhood, including Santiago Jaramillo, are working to raise awareness about climate change in the community. (Joe Mahoney/The Colorado Trust)

DENVER – If climate pollution continues at current levels, Denver could see more than a month of 100-plus degree days by 2050 in the worst years, according to analysis from the city and county of Denver. Elizabeth Babcock, the manager of air, water and climate with the city's Department of E

An event dubbed

BOULDER, Colo. -- Boulder's public library will host an array of international writers this weekend as part of the ZEE Jaipur Literature Festival. The event kicks off Friday and will feature India's Ambassador to Canada, Vikas Swarup, better known as the author of the book “Q&A,” whic

Scott Bookman with Uncompahgre Medical Center in Norwood says connectivity issues can slow transmission of medical images such as x-rays to remote radiologists, hampering diagnosis and care for patients. (David Cornwell)

DENVER – Colorado leaders are doubling down on efforts to make sure all parts of the state have high-speed access to the Internet. Tony Neal-Graves, executive director of the Broadband Office for the Governor's Office of Information Technology, says government has a role to play getting all

If President Trump eliminates the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, hundreds of thousands of immigrants could be at risk of deportation. (Pixabay)

DENVER - People advocating for immigrants in Denver scored a win this week when the City Council approved a bill that puts strict limits on how officials can assist federal agents. Corrine Rivera-Fowler, policy and civic engagement director for the group Padres and Jóvenes Unidos, said the mov

A new summer institute launched by the University of Denver is part of an effort to create a global women's leadership network. (Rhododendrites/Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER – From record-breaking crowds at the Women's March, to ongoing protests in Venezuela and sustained mobilization in Zimbabwe, women are driving movements to resist authoritarianism and create progressive social change. Erica Chenoweth, a professor at the University of Denver's Korbel S

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