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PNS Daily Newscast - August 17, 2017 


On our nationwide rundown; President Trump disbands two economic councils as CEO’s resign in protest; we will tell you why Iowa, like Trump, has bias issues; plus land trusts are a prime spot to view Monday’s solar eclipse.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Environmental Justice

The ZIP code for neighborhoods surrounding the Suncor Refinery in Commerce City, 80216, was recently named the nation's most polluted. (Jeffrey Beall/Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER - Today is the final day for the public to weigh in on Suncor Energy's request to boost production and emissions at its Commerce City refinery. Hilda Nucete, organizing program director for the group Protégete: Our Air, Our Health, said Suncor has a history of violating air pollution st

Scientists warn if the U.S. continues business as usual, climate change could lead to the largest transfer of wealth from the poor to the rich in the nationís history. (Getty Images)

DENVER – Rocky Mountain and Western states could see some benefits as climate change forces people and assets to move away from the nation's hottest regions into more temperate areas, but scientists project economic inequality will increase as the planet warms. Rutgers University Professor R

Community health centers in Colorado - which provide medical, dental and mental-health care regardless of a person's ability to pay - are helping reduce health-care costs. (Pixabay)

DENVER - President Donald Trump's proposed budget includes cutting more than $800 billion from Medicaid, and some Colorado health officials are concerned the move could reverse progress made by a pilot program that has managed to improve health outcomes and cut costs. Ross Brooks, chief executive o

National and state-based clean air policies, including reducing pollution from coal-fired power plants, are helping improve air quality in Colorado. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- Air quality in Colorado is getting better, according to the American Lung Association's latest report card. Last year, Denver was ranked eighth most ozone-polluted city nationally. Now it’s the 11th. Fort Collins also dropped from tenth to 15th. Dawn Mullally, director of air qua

Activists are concerned that Colorado legislation to make tampering with oil and gas operations a felony is a way to reduce environmental activism. (Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER - A bill on the Colorado Senate floor today would increase the penalties for disruptive behavior at fossil-fuel sites. Tampering with industrial equipment at an oil or natural gas site is a Class Two misdemeanor in Colorado, but Senate Bill 17-035 aims to make it a Class Six felony. If pass

Latino voters say environmental issues are an important factor in their decisions inside the voting booth. (Pixabay)

DENVER – More than 70 percent of Latino voters are deeply concerned about the environment and how it affects their families. That's according to a new Latino Decisions poll, which found over 90 percent of Latino Coloradans want the President-elect and new Congress to fight climate change. Do

One-year-old Alden Mock is tested for lead exposure at the Pediatric Associates office in Montrose. (Nathaniel Wick for The Colorado Trust)

DENVER – Many children in Colorado are at a high risk for lead poisoning, but aren't being tested, according to analysis by The Colorado Trust. State guidelines call for doctors to test children in low-income households, and in housing built before 1978, when lead paint was banned. Mike Va

A new report predicts emissions from oil, gas and coal currently in production are enough to raise global temperatures above limits set in Paris. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Existing fossil fuel production is enough to blow the world's entire remaining carbon budget for keeping global temperatures below limits set at last year's Paris climate summit, according to a new report from Oil Change International. David Turnbull, a report contributor, says if t

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