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PNS Daily Newscast - December 15, 2017 


What's next following the FCC vote to end net neutrality? We have a pair of reports. Also on our Friday rundown: We'll let you know why adolescents in foster care need opportunities to thrive; and steps you can take to avoid losing your holiday loot.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Poverty Issues

Consumer advocates warn that tax breaks that primarily benefit corporations and the top one percent of earners could lead to cuts to Medicare and Medicaid. (Getty Images)

DENVER – As Republicans work to bridge divides between the House and Senate versions of their new tax legislation, consumer advocates are warning that the measure could have significant health consequences. By removing the Affordable Care Act's mandate for all people to buy health insurance,

HIV tests are free today at the Planned Parenthood health centers in Colorado Springs, Greeley and Salida, and at the Jefferson County Public Health clinic in Lakewood. (Pixabay)

BOULDER, Co. – Today is World AIDS Day, and people around the world are doubling down on prevention efforts, and remembering lives lost. More than 36 million people live with HIV worldwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But since the pandemic peaked in 2005, AI

Many seasonal jobs at Colorado ski resorts don't provide health coverage, and premiums can top $1,000 a month for high-deductible plans. (Getty Images)

DENVER -- In 2011, 16 percent of Colorado residents did not have health insurance, but by 2015 - after the rollout of the Affordable Care Act - that rate had dropped to just over 6 percent and is holding steady. That's according to the 2017 Colorado Health Access Survey. Michele Lueck, executive d

In 2016, 235,000 SNAP recipients were Colorado children. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Groups that advocate for children, the elderly and people with disabilities are rolling up their sleeves in the wake of the budget passed last week in the U.S. House of Representatives. The measure includes $150 billion in cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

Residents of Westminster, Colo., are asking the city to consider creating an affordable-housing trust fund to help struggling families stay in their homes. (Getty Images)

WESTMINSTER, Co. – We Organize Westminster, or WOW, has a public assembly Saturday to address what the group is calling a housing and renters' rights crisis in the Denver suburb. In the five years, Inez Marquez has lived at the Copperwood Apartments, she says the rent for the one-bedroom uni

Residents of Denver's Westwood neighborhood, including Santiago Jaramillo, are working to raise awareness about climate change in the community. (Joe Mahoney/The Colorado Trust)

DENVER – If climate pollution continues at current levels, Denver could see more than a month of 100-plus degree days by 2050 in the worst years, according to analysis from the city and county of Denver. Elizabeth Babcock, the manager of air, water and climate with the city's Department of E

Just 4 percent of Colorado kids lack health coverage, down from 14 percent in 2008. (Getty Images)

DENVER – The percentage of people living below the federal poverty level in Colorado continues to be below the national average, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau. And, the state's child poverty rate dropped to just over 13 percent in 2016, down from nearly 15 percent the pre

Children, seniors and people with disabilities receive almost 70 percent of SNAP benefits. (Getty Images)

DENVER – The Trump administration's tax proposals would not benefit all taxpayers or states equally, according to new analysis from the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Matt Gardner, a senior fellow with the institute, says the richest 1 percent of taxpayers would receive more than

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