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PNS Daily News - March 29, 2017 


Here’s a look at what’s making news today: Trump follows through on promises to dismantle climate policies; the head of the White House-Russia investigation says he won’t step down; and coast-to-coast opposition grows to Session’s sanctuary cities stance.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Criminal Justice

New reports show some rulings by President Trump's Supreme Court nominee have allowed schools to use force against and to isolate students with disabilities. (Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER – According to two new reports, Judge Neil Gorsuch – President Donald Trump's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court – has repeatedly failed to protect the rights of students with disabilities. Gorsuch is set to testify before the U.S. Senate Monday. National Education Assoc

Latest Colorado state required police-related shootings just out. (aijohn784/iStockphoto)

By Stephanie Cook CU News Corps The number of officer-involved shootings in Colorado has increased each year since 2011, according to a new report from the Colorado Department of Public Safety. Between 2011 and 2015, the number of incidents reported by law enforcement nearly doubled, from 27 in 201

Activists are concerned that Colorado legislation to make tampering with oil and gas operations a felony is a way to reduce environmental activism. (Wikimedia Commons)

DENVER - A bill on the Colorado Senate floor today would increase the penalties for disruptive behavior at fossil-fuel sites. Tampering with industrial equipment at an oil or natural gas site is a Class Two misdemeanor in Colorado, but Senate Bill 17-035 aims to make it a Class Six felony. If pass

A report summarizing four decades of research concludes that immigrants benefit U.S. communities and do not increase crime. (Pixabay)

DENVER – As President Donald Trump continues to make good on promises to deport undocumented immigrants – with some in Colorado seeking protection in sanctuary churches – a new study shows U.S. cities with large immigrant populations experience lower rates of crime. Contrary to t

More people die during police encounters than previously reported. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Police officers have the legal authority to take lives, but keeping tabs on how many people are killed each year hasn't been easy. Brandon Patterson, a staff reporter for Mother Jones, broke down new Department of Justice data, which show police-related fatalities in the U.S. are si

Undocumented workers are frequently forced to accept illegal

DENVER -- Undocumented workers aren't stealing identities in order to get jobs in the U.S. nearly as frequently as they are forced by their employers to accept identities "on loan.” That's the finding of a new study from the University of Colorado Denver. Report author and assistant professo

Coloradans can avoid scams by researching groups before making end-of-year contributions. (CentralITAlliance/iStockphoto)

DENVER - The season of giving is in full swing, and it's also the time when many Coloradans make end-of-year tax-deductible donations to their favorite nonprofits. Out of 13,000 registered charities in Colorado, 2,000 have been prohibited from soliciting contributions. Colorado Attorney General Cyn

North High School students in Denver demonstrate against the school-to-prison pipeline during the Dignity in Schools 2015 Week of Action. (Padres & Jóvenes Unidos)

LEADVILLE, CO – A school district in rural Colorado is shifting its approach to student discipline in an effort to keep more kids in school and out of trouble - part of a growing trend away from '90s-era zero-tolerance policies that fed a rise in what's been called the school-to-prison pipelin

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