Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 30, 2017 


Featured on today’s rundown; LGBTQ Americans excluded from the 2020 Census; we take a look at how Trump’s energy policies could hurt the sector’s biggest jobs creator; plus how overturning online privacy rules may especially impact immigrants.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CT: Water

Atlantic sturgeon travel 140 miles up the Connecticut River to spawn. (NASA Earth Observatory)

OLD LYME, Conn. – Environmental advocates are concerned that a proposed railroad tunnel could threaten endangered species in Connecticut. The original plan for the Northeast Corridor rail project called for a bridge over the Connecticut River. But, in the year between the release of the draf

The EPA is scheduled to update regulations for copper and lead in drinking water this year. (Meir Roth/Pexels)

HARTFORD, Conn. – Environmental advocates say a new executive order issued by President Trump threatens clean air and water safeguards and puts communities at risk. It's called the Presidential Executive Order on Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs. But according to Martin Ha

Under a consent decree approved in 2000, General Electric agreed to clean up PCBs in the Housatonic River.  (John Phelan/Wikimedia Commons)

LITCHFIELD, Conn. – The Environmental Protection Agency has rejected General Electric's objections to a plan to remove PCBs from the Housatonic River. The EPA's $613 million plan calls for sediment to be dredged from the river south of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where GE dumped the PCBs into

A Hartford area water plant will produce millions of bottles of water a day. (Steven Depolo/Flickr)

BLOOMFIELD, Conn. - A deal allowing a commercial company to bottle and sell water from the Hartford area's public water supply has some residents up in arms. Niagara Bottling plans to draw up to 1.8 million gallons of water a day from the system for sale as bottled water. Valerie Rossetti of the

Removal of this dam in Lyme, Conn., will restore natural conditions to 8.3 miles of streams. Credit: Sally Harold.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. – A project to remove some of the many dams in Connecticut is restoring streams and helping migratory fish return to their old spawning grounds. There are more than 5,000 dams in the state, some more than 200 years old. Sally Harold, director of river restoration and fish pa

PHOTO: Connecticut is not cost-effective turf for natural-gas

HARTFORD, Conn. – Connecticut may not be the most welcoming or cost-effective state for natural gas fracking, but conservation advocates are nevertheless sending an Earth Week message to ban fracking waste from entering the state. It has been a busy week for John Calandrelli, program director

HARTFORD, Conn. - Support for environmental issues is waning among members of the Connecticut General Assembly, according to a watchdog group's annual scorecard released Tuesday, but the downward trend is not enough to seriously undermine the state's record as an environmental leader. Lori Brown, e

HARTFORD, Conn. - The Environment Committee of the Connecticut General Assembly has approved a bill that would move beyond the state's success in addressing concerns about individual chemicals, such as bisphenol-A, which was banned last year from baby bottles and other plastic containers. The bill w

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