Newscasts

PNS Weekend Newscast - August 19th, 2017 


Here's what we're covering: President Trump got rid of his campaign adviser, health experts are looking into who would be hurt most from climate change, and kids in one state are getting more help dealing with trauma.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - FL: Housing/Homelessness

More than one in five U.S. children live in poverty. (taliesin/morguefile)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — At the conventions and on the campaign trail, Floridians are hearing plenty from both presidential candidates, but there's one major issue neither one is talking about: the millions of children across the nation who are living in poverty. The child poverty rate has been o

The potential for another round of immigration raids weighs heavily on many Floridians. (www.ice.gov)

HOMESTEAD, Fla. - Lis-Marie (LEES-marie) Alvarado, immigration organizing coordinator, American Friends Service Committee. A series of controversial raids targeting undocumented immigrants is drawing outrage and concern in Florida. Government officials say 121 adults and children were taken into cu

Ten years after Katrina, work still needs to be done to protect Florida from another hurricane. Credit: artboymb/iStock

AVENTURA, Fl. - Ten years ago this week, Hurricane Katrina killed 14 people in Florida and an additional 1,800 in the other Gulf states. It remains the deadliest and most damaging hurricane in United States history. So, environmental advocates are assessing the progress made and the work still to

PHOTO: As the 2015 hurricane season gets underway, insurance experts recommend consumers do a double-check of insurance policies to make sure they're fully covered. Photo credit: SpriotGirl04/Morguefile.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - This week marks the beginning of the 2015 hurricane season in the U.S., and with the significant risk of hurricane damage in Florida – from the state's extensive coastline to the interior – insurance experts say it's a good time for Floridians to do a check-up on thei

PHOTO: A family setting for Florida's foster children is key to ensuring their success later in life, according to a report released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - According to a report released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, of the more than 18,000 children in Florida's foster care system, 86 percent are placed within a family setting – slightly higher than the national average. Many of those children who remain in a grou

PHOTO: A homeless man seeks shelter in downtown Miami, where the City Commission has delayed a decision on whether to outlaw camping on public property for another month. Photo credit: xynntii/Flickr.com.

MIAMI - In the shadows of - and in contrast to - the city's new multimillion-dollar condominiums, hundreds of Miami's homeless can be seen seeking shelter in tents. To address what he calls "safety concerns," City Commissioner Mark Sarnoff is proposing an ordinance designed to remove those tents by

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - Florida real estate developers were selling houses as fast as they could build them until the bottom fell out of the market. Now, hundreds of new homes and condos stand empty, threatened with decay and vandalism. What can property owners do to preserve their investment until a h

ORLANDO, Fla. - The massive budget cuts passed by the Republican-controlled Florida Legislature, and signed into law by Tea Party-backed Gov. Rick Scott, are coming home to roost in Florida's municipalities. Municipal leaders say their cities are being hit hard, with cuts in social services, public

1 of 2 pages   1 2 >  Last »