Newscasts

Updated PNS Daily Newscast - September, 22 2017 


The news we're following on today's rundown: Facebook turns over Russia-linked ads to Congress; how Senate Republicans’ new health-care bill could hurt the fight against the opioid epidemic; and Texas food banks prepare to serve the long-term needs of Harvey victims.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - FL: Consumer Issues

The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) provides health insurance to low-income children who don't otherwise qualify for Medicaid. (Pawel Loj/Flickr)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida has done a lot to make sure more children have health insurance. But that progress may be in jeopardy if Congress doesn't act soon. A new report shows the number of children without health insurance in Florida dropped 57 percent between 2009 and 2016. Report c

Nursing home deaths prompt new rules by Florida Governor (Salvador Altimir/Flickr)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Even though a fully functioning hospital was across the street, eight residents died in a sweltering nursing home without air-conditioning in the Miami suburb of Hollywood, while calls for help were ignored. Brian Lee, who was forced out as Florida's long-term care ombudsman,

Gov. Rick Scott is calling on volunteers to help out after Hurricane Irma. (City of St. Petersburg/Flickr)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Gov. Rick Scott has taken to Twitter with his plea for 1,000 volunteer nurses to help the state's special needs shelters in the wake of Hurricane Irma. "We've done everything we can to open shelters. We've worked to make sure people get food. We've spent hours trying to m

How much will Floridians be willing to pay for fresh water or other essentials? Some are reporting price gouging to the AG's office. Mark Wilson/Getty Images

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida law prohibits extreme increases in the price of essential commodities any time there is a state of emergency. That includes such items as food and water, ice, gasoline, lumber and equipment, and even hotel rooms. Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is asking anyone

The last major overhaul of Florida's workers' compensation system took place in 2003. (Longislandwins/Flickr)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida is supposed to provide workers' compensation benefits to all workers despite their legal status, but some employers and insurance companies have found a way to beat the system. An investigation by NPR and ProPublica found that, of the 800 undocumented people charg

Florida ratepayers are left on the hook for failed nuclear projects. (Mark Goebel/Flickr)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – A federal appeals court hears arguments this week in a case challenging a Florida law that leaves utility customers on the hook for speculative nuclear projects. The controversial nuclear cost-recovery law passed in 2006, at a time when nuclear power appeared to be making

A tiny bug newly introduced to Florida from Asia attacks citrus trees and some ornamental plants. (Department of Agriculture)

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – A tiny insect is placing Florida citrus in jeopardy, but residents can help. Citrus trees in the Sunshine State are under attack from the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), a tiny mottled brown insect about the size of an aphid that feeds on the new leafs of citrus trees and som

Close to half of American workers report not getting enough sleep at night. (osha.gov)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – How many times a week do you say you're tired? For some, it's actually causing problems in their lives and on the job. A new report by the National Safety Council finds more than half of American workers feel less productive because they're too tired, and 4 in 10 have t

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