Newscasts

PNS Daily News - March 28, 2017 


We’re covering a variety of issues today including: word of a secret White House visit prompts calls for the House Intelligence chair to recuse himself from the Russia investigation; internet activity could be sold to the highest bidder under a bill up for a vote; and new research shows Uncle Sam is taking more from undocumented immigrants than the wealthy.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Endangered Species & Wildlife

An inventory of Indiana's older forests already has identified more than 1,250 species, with hundreds more still being tallied. (Indiana Forest Alliance)

INDIANAPOLIS - Scientists have spent the past few years in some of Indiana's older forests, trying to inventory flora, fauna and wildlife before the trees are cut down to be sold as timber. The Indiana Forest Alliance has gotten a two-year grant to expand the study. The inventory, known as the Ecob

Invading species are picked up in one port by freighters, cruise and cargo ships and then the ballast water is dumped into another port. (usbr.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - The Great Lakes aren't normally a huge part of the nation's military footprint but there's a lot at stake for them in the defense spending bill under discussion in Congress. Last week the House voted for the National Defense Authorization Act, and one of the provisions in it r

The Monarch butterfly is disappearing but home gardeners can help by planting milkweed, which is its only breeding habitat. (U.S Fish and Wildlife Service)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - Scientists who have been analyzing data collected on monarch butterflies got a bit of good news recently. There were more of them wintering in Mexico than anticipated. Brice Semmens, assistant professor at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, says they're not out of the wood

Indiana was able to set 1,330 acres aside last year for wildlife habitat with federal wildlife restoration money. (Lorie Tuter)

INDIANAPOLIS - Money from taxes on guns, ammunition and fishing equipment is being doled out to all 50 states to be used to help protect fishing, hunting and wildlife areas. Indiana's share is close to $17 million. Over the past several years, said Jim Hodgson, Midwestern Division chief for the Wil

Work will begin in the spring to restore habitat around Lake George in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. (Save the Dunes)

INDIANAPOLIS - Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore hugs 15 miles of the southern shore of Lake Michigan and is the state's biggest tourist attraction, with an estimated 3 million visitors a year. Nicole Barker, executive director of the group Save the Dunes, says most people aren't aware the National

The smooth green snake is a tiny nonvenomous snake found in Indiana. It's getting extra attention from conservation groups in the Midwest because its habitat is threatened. (Chicago Wilderness)

INDIANAPOLIS – Twelve animal species that call the Midwest home are being championed by Chicago Wilderness, which is made up of more than 200 conservation groups in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin. Scientists, educators and ecologists spent months deciding which would be added to t

The Indiana Forest Alliance warns without greater protections, in another decade, there won't be any state forest lands that haven't been logged. (Veronica Carter)

INDIANAPOLIS – The Indiana Forest Alliance has a vision of old growth forests being preserved for wildlife, and people who love nature to enjoy. The group has tried three times to get legislation passed to make 10 percent of state forests off limits to timber harvest without success. Jeff

Four captive-hunting preserves in Indiana are operating under a court injunction. Credit: Eric Berthe/Morguefile

INDIANAPOLIS – The killing of a beloved lion by an American hunter in Africa sparked global outrage this summer, and it's also bringing to light the issue of captive, or canned, hunting in Indiana and other states. In these hunts, shooters pay to kill animals trapped behind fences. In other

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