Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 18, 2017 


Featured on our nationwide rundown; President Trump’s reported comments to a grieving military widow raising some eyebrows; we’ve got a breakdown on the impact of “Trumpcare” in states like Colorado; and a look back 50 years at Dow Chemical protests that turned violent in Wisconsin.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Endangered Species & Wildlife

Logging has caused erosion at Yellowwood State Forest. (ifa.org)

NASHVILLE, Ind. – When people are asked to name the most beautiful area of Indiana, Brown County is the answer most often given. People who live there and others who want to preserve its scenic beauty are fighting back against a plan to log in the Yellowwood State Forest. The Indiana Divis

One of the grassland birds that's seen a rebound in Indiana and the Midwest is the bobolink. (ohio.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS – The 2018 Farm Bill soon will be debated in Congress, and advocates say not only is it crucial for agriculture, it's also key for birds in this nation. The State of the Birds 2017 report from the North American Bird Conservation Initiative says conservation programs have been h

A clearcut in Pike State Forest in southwestern Indiana. (Greg Clarke)

INDIANAPOLIS – States that neighbor Indiana are protecting their old forests, and conservation advocates want to know why the Hoosier State isn't doing the same. Michigan has designated more than 116,000 acres of state forests off limits to logging. In 1972, Ohio set aside nearly 8,000 acres

The Veterans Administration recently backed off of a plan to cut down ancient trees in Indiana to make way for a memorial. (Virginia Carter)

NASHVILLE, Ind. – An effort is under way to designate an old-growth forest in every county in the United States that has forestland. The Old-Growth Forest Network is spearheading the effort, and the group’s executive director, Joan Maloof, will speak on the topic in Indiana next month.

An inventory of Indiana's older forests already has identified more than 1,250 species, with hundreds more still being tallied. (Indiana Forest Alliance)

INDIANAPOLIS - Scientists have spent the past few years in some of Indiana's older forests, trying to inventory flora, fauna and wildlife before the trees are cut down to be sold as timber. The Indiana Forest Alliance has gotten a two-year grant to expand the study. The inventory, known as the Ecob

Invading species are picked up in one port by freighters, cruise and cargo ships and then the ballast water is dumped into another port. (usbr.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - The Great Lakes aren't normally a huge part of the nation's military footprint but there's a lot at stake for them in the defense spending bill under discussion in Congress. Last week the House voted for the National Defense Authorization Act, and one of the provisions in it r

The Monarch butterfly is disappearing but home gardeners can help by planting milkweed, which is its only breeding habitat. (U.S Fish and Wildlife Service)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - Scientists who have been analyzing data collected on monarch butterflies got a bit of good news recently. There were more of them wintering in Mexico than anticipated. Brice Semmens, assistant professor at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, says they're not out of the wood

Indiana was able to set 1,330 acres aside last year for wildlife habitat with federal wildlife restoration money. (Lorie Tuter)

INDIANAPOLIS - Money from taxes on guns, ammunition and fishing equipment is being doled out to all 50 states to be used to help protect fishing, hunting and wildlife areas. Indiana's share is close to $17 million. Over the past several years, said Jim Hodgson, Midwestern Division chief for the Wil

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