Newscasts

PNS Daily News - August 22, 2017 


We're featuring a variety of stories in today’s news including: a new strategy for Afghanistan; an increase in hate groups is not just an issue in the South; and high blood pressure becoming a more common problem among children and teens.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Livable Wages/Working Families

This summer, a study will get under way on the potential effects of a paid family leave policy for Indiana. (Kimberlyn Thresher)

INDIANAPOLIS - Advocates for Indiana's working families say this legislative year was both good and bad. Lawmakers approved a plan to expand a pre-kindergarten program and raised the asset limit for people receiving SNAP benefits. Gov. Eric Holcomb also announced Tuesday that, although he's signing

Indiana's food banks provide meals to more than 1 million people each year. (feedingindianashungry.org)

INDIANAPOLIS – Lawmakers are considering several bills this legislative session dealing with hunger issues in Indiana. Thursday, the Senate is expected to vote on SB 9, which would remove a lifetime SNAP benefit ban on anyone who's been convicted on felony drug charges. Emily Weikert Brya

Many women in Indiana go back to work early because they can't afford to stay home after a baby is born. (Sierra Neely)

INDIANAPOLIS – One in three Hoosiers struggles to afford the basic necessities, and those also are the workers least likely to have access to paid family and medical leave. A new report by the Indiana Institute for Working Families looks at what other states and countries are doing for workin

One in six Indiana residents is considered food insecure, and the statistics are even higher for families with children. (US Dept. of Agriculture)

INDIANAPOLIS – While many of us attend holiday parties that center around food this time of the year, and maybe worry about eating too much – it can be easy to overlook the fact that people around us may not have enough to eat. One in six Hoosiers doesn't always know where their next me

More than a third of Hoosiers are considered food insecure. (Virginia Carter)

INDIANAPOLIS – The Hunger Action 2016 campaign is under way in Indiana and across the nation. In Indiana, more than one million people struggle with hunger and may not know where they'll find their next meal. That number includes one in five kids who may not have enough to eat. Emily Weikert

A new United Way report says many working-class families struggle financially in Indiana, especially those headed by a single parent. (Sierra Neely)

INDIANAPOLIS - United Way has released its ALICE report, which stands for "Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed" - an apt description of many Hoosiers. According to the report, 36 percent of Indiana households in 2014 could not afford basic needs such as housing, child care, food, health car

Research says making it easier for workers to get by isn't the only reason to increase wages. It would also work to fight crime. (The All-Nite Images/Flickr)

INDIANAPOLIS – Over the weekend, workers calling for a $15 hourly minimum wage held a national march and rally in Virginia – and research is showing a higher wage could have benefits that reach far beyond families' monthly budgets. The idea that increasing the minimum wage can reduce c

Indiana is just one of a few states without comprehensive Pre-K programs. (Ona Mora)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - The battle for quality Pre-K education in Indiana continues as the November election draws near. Governor Mike Pence had pushed for a pilot program called On My Way Pre-K, but then rejected millions of dollars in federal funding. Pence is in a tough battle for re-election, and h

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