Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - December 13, 2017 


Alabama elects Democrat Doug Jones to the U.S. Senate; also on our rundown; A court victory for tribes and environmental groups fighting uranium mining in the Grand Canyon; and Seattle appears headed towards a police accountability initiative for 2018.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - KY: Endangered Species & Wildlife

Conservationists are fighting back against attempts to gut new regulations that attempt to stop future pollution of streams such as this one that spills into the Kentucky River. (Tarence Ray)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – A coalition of community and conservation groups is fighting back against attempts by state officials in Kentucky and 13 other coal-producing states to stop enforcement of the Stream Protection Rule, which was finalized last month by the Interior Department. The states want t

This is the Red River, where nearly a half-century ago a flood-control project sparked controversy. (U.S. Forest Service)

STANTON, Ky. – A pivotal moment in stopping a controversial plan to dam the Red River, part of which is now Kentucky's only National Wild and Scenic River, happened 49 years ago today. Nearly a half-century later, it's still vividly remembered by many as a watershed moment in the lengthy, con

Conservationists want state lawmakers to restore funding cuts that the conservationists say have crippled land-conservation programs in Kentucky. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Conservationists are in Frankfort today, telling lawmakers that budget cuts are handcuffing efforts to protect public lands - land often used for recreation. Ruth Banberger, the Sierra Club's legislative chair, said the state is "robbing" funds specifically earmarked for land-conse

New federal regulations on pollution from surface mining, known as the Stream Protection Rule, are the focus of a public hearing tonight in Lexington. Credit: Vivian Stockman. Flyover courtesy SouthWings.

LEXINGTON, Ky. – The federal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement will hold a public hearing in Lexington tonight about a proposed rule to determine how water pollution from mining operations is tested, regulated, controlled and enforced. Teri Blanton, a member of the grassroo

Concerns over fracking in Kentucky have produced large turnouts at public meetings, including this one earlier this year in Berea. There's another meeting on oil and gas development tonight in Hazard. Credit: Greg Stotelmyer.

HAZARD, Ky. - Eastern Kentucky has become ground zero for testing of potential high-volume, hydraulic fracturing in the state. Tonight in Hazard, the Energy and Environment Cabinet concludes a series of public meetings across the state on oil and gas development. Kim Walters says she will be there

A coalition of conservation groups wants the EPA to reassess the impact pollution runoff from farming and coal mining has on Kentucky's water and the wildlife that depends on that water. Photo courtesy of NOAA.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - A coalition of conservation groups claims recently weakened federal water quality standards pose a threat to wildlife in Kentucky - both from coal mining and agricultural pollution. The conservation groups are asking the U.S. District Court to order the Environmental Protection Ag

PHOTO: The EPA is holding public hearings this week on its proposed tougher carbon emission standards - a controversial proposal here in coal-producing Kentucky. Photo by Greg Stotelmyer.

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Proposed carbon emissions standards would cut carbon pollution in the power sector by 30 percent compared to 2005 levels. The proposed rules, which the Environmental Protection Agency rolled out June 2, are controversial in Kentucky, one of the top coal-producing states in t

PHOTO: A combination of sequestration, October's government shutdown and the current budget battles in Congress are jeopardizing national parks, including Kentucky's Mammoth Cave National Park, says the National Parks Conservation Association. Photo courtesy National Park Service.

MAMMOTH CAVE, Ky. - The budget tug-of-war in Washington is damaging the National Park System, according to an organization that works to protect and enhance the parks. The National Parks Conservation Association estimates the 16-day government shutdown in October already cost $30 million a day syste

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