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PNS Daily News - April 24, 2017 


We're highlighting several stories in today's news including: Congress returns from recess to a showdown over a border wall; immigrants may face the collateral damage of crime lab misconduct; and President Trump expected to move forward on offshore drilling.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - KY: Sustainable Agriculture

Jane Herrod is one of the Kentucky farmers growing a test plot of industrial hemp this summer. (Catherine Moore)

LEXINGTON, Ky. — Kentucky is experimenting with industrial hemp as dozens of farmers grow test plots covering 45,000 acres. This is the second summer that the crop has been grown on Jane Herrod's small farm along the Kentucky River in Fayette County. She said the experiment is filled with regu

Kentucky is expanding it's Double Dollars program which helps lower-income residents purchase more fresh produce. (Greg Stotelmyer)

BEREA, Ky. - Two summers ago, six farmers' markets in Kentucky were participating in cost-sharing support programs organized by the Community Farm Alliance. This summer it's up to 33 markets. For example, about two-dozen markets now are part of the Double Dollars program. Martin Richards, executiv

Shopping for fresh fruits and vegetables through Farmacy, an innovative healthy eating program. (Greg Stotelmyer)

WHITESBURG, Ky. – When people think of prescriptions, they usually think of medicine, not tomatoes or cantaloupe. But there are now some doctors in eastern Kentucky writing their patients prescriptions for fresh produce. The Farmacy Program – that's pharmacy with an F – was sta

Retired journalist Jim Branscome, a native of Appalachia who covered the War on Poverty, has a plan for reviving the coal region's economy. (Joel Blocker)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – With the decline of the coal industry in Appalachia, plenty of ideas are being raised on how to revive the region's economy. Jim Branscome, a former journalist and retired managing director of Standard and Poor's Financial Services, calls his the Appalachian Homestead Act, a

Moving some produce from this farm in Shelby County and others to food banks in Kentucky is seen as a win-win. (Courtney Farms, LLC)

SHELBY COUNTY, Ky. - Not everything Kentucky farmers harvest from their fields can go to market but there is a way for them to recoup some of their costs and help others at the same time. Farmers who deliver produce rejected by retailers to a food bank distribution center can have the cost of pick

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentuckians can donate some of their state income tax refund to the Farms to Food Banks Trust Fund. State Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles says the fund helps food banks distribute surplus produce to hungry Kentuckians. "We know it works,” he states. “There

The locally-grown food movement is growing in Kentucky, but it faces complex challenges. Credit Greg Stotelmyer.

MOUNT STERLING, Ky. - While Steve Muntz describes his farm in Montgomery County as a "small sheep farm with a few pasture poultry," his involvement in sustainable agriculture reaches across the entire southern U.S. He is executive director of the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group, an

The loss of coal-industry jobs is a big part of widening prosperity gap between eastern Kentucky and rest of state. Credit: Greg Stotelmyer

BEREA, Ky. - While the U.S. Census Bureau's new numbers show Kentucky's poverty rate remains basically unchanged, one economic policy analyst says mining deeper into the numbers uncovers a much bigger problem facing the state's Appalachian coal region. Ashley Spalding, research and policy associa

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