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PNS Daily News - March 29, 2017 


Here’s a look at what’s making news today: Trump follows through on promises to dismantle climate policies; the head of the White House-Russia investigation says he won’t step down; and coast-to-coast opposition grows to Session’s sanctuary cities stance.

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Public News Service - KY: Welfare Reform

Dr. Gail Christopher, a  national expert in holistic health and diversity, told community and health leaders in Kentucky that if they work more on improving inequities the state's health will improve. (Shannon Wells)

LEXINGTON, Ky. - A national expert in holistic health and diversity told community and health leaders in Kentucky yesterday that if they work more on improving inequities, including income and access to care, the health of the state's population will improve. The message came from Dr. Gail Christo

Kentucky's huge drop in uninsured adults is good for both parents and their kids, say children's advocates. (Greg Stotelmyer)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - The percentage of Americans without insurance is at an all-time low. A new census survey finds that more than 9 percent are uninsured nationwide, and it's even lower in Kentucky, at 6 percent. Sonya Begay of Berea, who is raising three teenage grandchildren, said she began receivi

Community health center leaders say Medicaid expansion is helping address racial and health disparities in Kentucky. (Shawnee Christian Healthcare)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- A new report from the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky found that race and ethnicity make a difference in how healthy you are. Phyliss Platt is the CEO at the Shawnee Christian Healthcare Center, a community health center in the west end of Louisville in a predominantly African

Integrating dental care at the same sites as people get medical care is one idea that could make Kentucky's Medicaid program work more efficiently. (Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - A broad cross-section of people who are interested in how Kentucky will implement changes to its Medicaid program have spoken - and their ideas are now being made public. Nearly 130 stakeholders were brought together earlier this month by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. Acc

Health-care advocates say Kentucky's transition to a single system to qualify people for Medicaid and other programs has led to long waits for help and enrollment problems. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - A "real mess." That's how one health-care advocate describes Kentucky's transition to a single system to determine eligibility for health insurance and other social services. People who depend on kynect – the state health-insurance exchange that was hailed as a model for the

Nearly a million Kentuckians are now covered by Medicaid as it turns 50 this week. Credit: Greg Stotelmyer.

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Medicaid turns 50 Thursday, and in Kentucky, with expansion under the Affordable Care Act, enrollment has swelled to 947,100 Kentuckians. Asked what she would write in an anniversary card to Medicaid, healthcare advocate Sheila Schuster said "congratulations, keep on going." She s

PHOTO: Harlan County native Kimberly Shepherd wants to stay and live in eastern Kentucky, but says transitioning the region to a new economy is crucial. She is one of the speakers during this year's I Love Mountains Day in Frankfort. Photo courtesy of Kentuckians for the Commonwealth.

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Citizens are rallying at the state Capitol on Thursday for what has become an annual tradition - "I Love Mountains Day." The event is organized by Kentuckians for the Commonwealth, a grassroots organization which has been in the vanguard pushing for an economic transition in easter

PHOTO: An estimated 14,000 to 20,000 undocumented individuals in Kentucky could be helped by President Obama's recent executive action, according to the Maxwell Street Legal Clinic in Lexington. Photo credit: Flickr.

LEXINGTON, Ky. - A Lexington immigration attorney says President Obama's controversial plan to grant five million undocumented individuals temporary stays and work permits is a "temporary fix." Guion Johnstone serves as program director at the Maxwell Street Legal Clinic, which offers assistance to

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