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PNS Daily News - April 24, 2017 


We're highlighting several stories in today's news including: Congress returns from recess to a showdown over a border wall; immigrants may face the collateral damage of crime lab misconduct; and President Trump expected to move forward on offshore drilling.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - KY: Census

New census figures say Kentucky's median income is up as more people are working, but the state still has one of the nation's highest poverty rates. (Greg Stotelmyer)

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Kentucky continues to have one of the highest poverty rates in the nation, showing only slight improvement in 2015. New Census Bureau figures show 18.5 percent of Kentuckians lived in poverty last year, down six-tenths of a percent from 2014, but still higher than just before the re

The loss of coal-industry jobs is a big part of widening prosperity gap between eastern Kentucky and rest of state. Credit: Greg Stotelmyer

BEREA, Ky. - While the U.S. Census Bureau's new numbers show Kentucky's poverty rate remains basically unchanged, one economic policy analyst says mining deeper into the numbers uncovers a much bigger problem facing the state's Appalachian coal region. Ashley Spalding, research and policy associa

PHOTO: Figures show an improving economy in 2013, according to the Census Bureau, but some experts caution the recovery is still not adding up to financial security for many middle and low-income Kentuckians. Photo by Greg Stotelmyer.

FRANKFORT, Ky. - The latest Census Bureau report shows an improving economy in 2013 but some experts caution the recovery is too slow to help the living standards of many middle and low-income Americans. In Kentucky, 18.8 percent of the people lived in poverty last year. That's down from 19.4 percen

GRAPHIC:

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - As the clock ticks on to Election Day, children's issues take center stage in Louisville one week from today. Participants at the "Step Up For Kids" conference will address where children fit into the picture on health, welfare, and justice issues. Dr. Terry Brooks, executive dir

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Fifteen percent of the people in Kentucky, roughly 640,000 residents, do not have health insurance. Groups that make up Kentucky Voices for Health (KVH) say the state could bring those numbers way down by doing one thing. KVH Executive Director Jodi Mitchell says it involves a pro

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Poverty's grip on Kentucky and elsewhere appears to be tightening. The Bluegrass State has the fifth-highest poverty rates in the nation, census data shows, and nearly one-third of the state's households earned less than $25,000 last year. Rob Jones, executive director of Communi

FRANKFORT, Ky. - When it comes to getting more uninsured Americans health care coverage under the new federal law, the group's name says it all: Enroll America. The coalition of insurers, hospitals, doctors, consumer groups, pharmaceutical companies and the like, says the timing could not be more cr

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Recent data from the U.S. Census track an historic shift in the nation's diversity, revealing that most of the country's babies are now members of minorities. And that, says a Kentucky trend tracker and long-time demographer, points to the need for policy and attitude changes. Ron

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