Newscasts

PNS Weekend Newscast - April 29th, 2017 


Here's what's happening: Donald Trump has now been president of the United States for 100 days, the People's Climate march on Washington is taking place today, and another missle launch from North Korea.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MD: Public Lands/Wilderness

Buying the Bay Plate supports education programs and restoration work benefitting the Chesapeake Bay. (cbtrust.org)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – For people who love the Chesapeake Bay and want to help protect it, one of the easiest ways is by purchasing the Bay Plate. Since it was released in 1991, about 400,000 have been sold, with the money going to help clean up and protect the Bay. Kelly Swartout, Director of Mar

Sea levels are expected to rise another foot by 2050, causing flooding and loss of wildlife habitat.(fws.gov)

BALTIMORE – Climate change already has had an impact on wildlife and communities along the Chesapeake Bay and on the East Coast, according to a new report, and it will only get worse unless there are cuts in carbon emissions. The National Wildlife Federation research called Changing Tides look

The birth of two baby bald eagles at the National Arboretum has sparked interest in America's national bird, and they can be spotted around the Chesapeake Bay. (Veronica Carter)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - All eyes on are the nation's capital, and not just to keep watch on lawmakers. There's a pair of newly-hatched baby bald eagles at the U.S. National Arboretum, and many are finding it addictive to watch the parents take care of them. Dad and Mom are known as "Mr. President" and "Fi

108 wildlife species, a quarter of them birds, are considered rare, threatened or endangered in Maryland and have been added to the action plan. (Badger Rose)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - Climate change, residential and commercial development, and pollution are listed as threats to wildlife in Maryland in a new 10-year action plan being released next month. For the first time, the report lists hydraulic fracturing as a threat to wildlife. State regulators are comin

Reducing pollution benefits fish and wildlife throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Credit: Mary Hollinger, NOAA/commons.wikimedia.org

BALTIMORE - Maryland groups will be receiving part of a record $11.5 million in grants for restoration, conservation and environmental outreach in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The grants, from the Chesapeake Bay Program and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, will help improve water qualit

Chesapeake Bay Conservation Corps members planting trees. The corps class of 2016 is being announced today. Photo courtesy: Chesapeake Bay Trust.

EDGEWATER, Md. – It's a tough job, but one so popular it's been expanded every year since 2010. Forty-one young men and woman ages 18 to 25 make up the Chesapeake Bay Conservation Corps class of 2016, being introduced today. The class will spend a year working on projects benefiting the Chesa

PHOTO: B.V. Wine from California's Napa Valley is donating a portion of profits from sales in Maryland, Delaware and Washington, D.C. to the nonprofit Chesapeake Bay Trust. The nonprofit funds about $5 million in projects and programs to improve the bay each year. Photo credit: NOAA.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - A bi-coastal partnership is mixing water with fine wines to benefit projects to restore Chesapeake Bay. Beaulieu Vineyard, or B.V. Wine, from California's Napa Valley is donating a portion of its profits from sales in Maryland, Delaware and Washington, D.C. to the nonprofit Chesape

PHOTO: $1.4 million is on its way to local communities from the Chesapeake Bay Trust. Some of the funding goes to schools. Photo courtesy of CBT.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - More than a million dollars is on its way to local communities from the Chesapeake Bay Trust, for projects aimed at improving the waters of the Bay. Grants totaling $1.4 million have been awarded to more than 100 nonprofits, municipalities and schools. According to Chesapeake Bay

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