Newscasts

PNS Daily News - March 28, 2017 


We’re covering a variety of issues today including: word of a secret White House visit prompts calls for the House Intelligence chair to recuse himself from the Russia investigation; internet activity could be sold to the highest bidder under a bill up for a vote; and new research shows Uncle Sam is taking more from undocumented immigrants than the wealthy.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MD: Rural/Farming

Opposition is mounting to proposed mega-mergers of chemical companies. (foe.org)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – Nearly 325 organizations have signed a letter pressing new U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to make sure the Justice Department does its job without political interference when it looks at a proposal to let Dow Chemical and DuPont, Monsanto and Bayer, and Syngenta and ChemC

Stormwater pollution in the Chesapeake Bay is harmful to wildlife. (USGS)

GAITHERSBURG, Md. - You can't always see pollution, and many times it comes from places you wouldn't expect. One major type of nitrogen pollution in the Chesapeake Bay continues to grow: untreated stormwater runoff from blacktop roofs and other hardened surfaces. Rain hits these roofs, then falls in

Honeybee colonies in the United States declined dramatically last year, and advocates say that's not sustainable for agriculture in the U.S. (USDA)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - U.S. beekeepers have reported losing nearly 44 percent of their colonies over the last year, according to an annual report just out. Tiffany Finck-Haynes, food futures campaigner for Friends of the Earth, says that's too high to be sustainable for agriculture in this country. She

Reducing pollution benefits fish and wildlife throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Credit: Mary Hollinger, NOAA/commons.wikimedia.org

BALTIMORE - Maryland groups will be receiving part of a record $11.5 million in grants for restoration, conservation and environmental outreach in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The grants, from the Chesapeake Bay Program and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, will help improve water qualit

Chesapeake Bay Conservation Corps members planting trees. The corps class of 2016 is being announced today. Photo courtesy: Chesapeake Bay Trust.

EDGEWATER, Md. – It's a tough job, but one so popular it's been expanded every year since 2010. Forty-one young men and woman ages 18 to 25 make up the Chesapeake Bay Conservation Corps class of 2016, being introduced today. The class will spend a year working on projects benefiting the Chesa

PHOTO: Organic farmers are finding few effective weapons for wiping out this year's bumper crop of stink bugs. Photo credit: http://njaes.rutgers.edu/

HARWOOD, Md. - The stink bug invasion is on, and sustainable, pesticide-free growers such as Blue Tomato Farms in southern Maryland are becoming casualties. Owner Shawn Sizer said he had to close his community-supported agriculture operation, which provides food deliveries to subscribing members, i

PHOTO: The Maryland Department of Agriculture is promoting local dairy farms that make their own ice cream. PHOTO CREDIT: MDA

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - It could be the coolest thing you do this weekend. July is National Ice Cream Month, and Maryland has created an ice cream trail to lead you to the best creamy concoctions in the state. Department of Agriculture spokesman Mark Powell said the eight dairy farms on the trail will di

PHOTO: The EPA and Chesapeake Bay Foundation are announcing a deal to reduce pollution from animal feedlots in the Chesapeake Bay region. Photo credit: EPA

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - Maryland's livestock and poultry farms are facing new federal scrutiny. Under an agreement announced late Wednesday between the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the EPA must audit state rules regarding how farms manage pollution and step

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