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PNS Weekend Newscast - August 19th, 2017 


Here's what we're covering: President Trump got rid of his campaign adviser, health experts are looking into who would be hurt most from climate change, and kids in one state are getting more help dealing with trauma.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MD: Poverty Issues

PTAs raise millions of dollars for schools around the nation, but a new report says most of the money benefits children in more affluent neighborhoods. (Victoria Jordan)

BALTIMORE – A new report looks at how much money is being raised by Parent Teacher Associations across the country, and reveals that schools in wealthy districts benefit the most. The Center for American Progress (CAP) examined the top 50 PTAs in the nation, which raised $43 million in the 2

Maryland watchdog groups say health insurance affordability and accessibility would be compromised under the American Health Care Act proposed by U.S. House Republicans. (V. Carter)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – On the heels of a report by the Congressional Budget Office that estimates the American Health Care Act would mean 24 million people would lose their health insurance, opponents of the plan in Maryland say they're gearing up for what could be a long battle. Vincent DiMarco,

The band

POTOMAC, Md. -- It may sound like a strange combination, but a rock band is mixing music and a message about financial literacy aimed at kids. The band Gooding will perform a couple of shows in Maryland in September before traveling to Washington, D.C., Delaware and Pennsylvania as part of a natio

Long before Election Day, people can also make their voices heard by being campaign workers for the candidates of their choice. (DodgertonSkillhause/morguefile)

BALTIMORE – As the November election draws closer, advocates for working families across the nation are trying to get the word out about how much each individual vote counts. In Maryland, volunteers are going door to door, talking about some of the issues on the ballot and the candidates who

Many parents and guardians don't know where children can get free summer meals. (Christine Marie Fletcher)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - About a quarter of a million children in Maryland rely on free and reduced-price school breakfast and lunch programs during the school year. but when summer rolls around, many of these children go hungry, according to the anti-hunger group Hunger Free America. Meals and snacks are

Nine of 10 Hispanic adults in Prince George's County don't have health insurance. (La Clinica del Pueblo)

HYATTSVILLE, Md. - Maryland's Hispanic community has grown to about 10 percent of the total population, and many don't have health insurance. A collaborative effort is under way in Maryland to provide health care to those who can't afford it. The focus is on Prince George's County, which has the

A civil rights lawsuit has been filed over a power plant given approval in a predominately black area of Prince George County. (Earthjustice)

Brandywine, MD - The state of Maryland is facing a federal civil rights complaint over approval of a gas-fired power plant in Brandywine. Earthjustice said the state is required under Title VI to consider whether there would be an "unjustified and unequal" impact on the basis of race. Neal Gormley

New food-stamp regulations are going into effect in Maryland next month, and food pantries may not be able to handle the influx. (Virginia Carter)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - People age 18 to 49 who are considered able-bodied adults with no dependents will lose SNAP benefits on April 1 unless they meet new federal requirements. They have to work at least 20 hours a week, be in school or participate in a volunteer or job-training program. Beth Martino,

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