Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 16, 2017 


On our rundown today: Trump says there were “very fine people on both sides” in Charlottesville, Virginia Saturday; a Minnesota church leader urges people to stand up against hate groups; and civil rights groups are outraged over the potential pardon of former Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MI: Disabilities

Those who hurt Michiganders with developmental disabilities could face harsher penalties. (anitapeppers/Morguefile)

LANSING, Mich. – There are new efforts in Michigan to crack down on those who hurt people with special needs. Rep. Frank Liberati, a Democrat, and Sen. Rick Jones, a Republican, have sponsored bills that would increase penalties for assaulting a person with a developmental disability. Jon

New research says women living closer to high levels of green vegetation have lower mortality rates than do women living in

LANSING, Mich. - Eating lots of greens has been known to improve health, but a new report indicates living near green vegetation may help some people live longer lives. Dr. Bonnie Joubert, population health branch scientific program director for the National Institute of Environmental Health Scien

Seventy-six Michigan children died as the result of abuse or neglect in 2014. (Pixabay)

LANSING, Mich. - Dozens of Michigan children die each year due to abuse or neglect, and today people from around the state will gather in Lansing to highlight the importance of prevention. April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, and the Michigan Children's Trust Fund is hosting its 8th annual Preve

The Flint community faces lifelong repercussions from the water crisis. (Pixabay)

FLINT, Mich. - The Michigan women who fought to expose the toxic lead in Flint's water say their efforts to protect the community are just getting started. In response to the crisis, state and federal investigations are under way, and millions of dollars to assist residents is expected from Michi

The women of Flint got the ball rolling on the response to the city's poisoned water. (Michigan NOW)

FLINT, Mich. - Whether it was the foul smell and brown color or the resulting rashes and hair loss, many Flint residents were immediately concerned after city switched its water source in April 2014. But it was a study months later that finally opened eyes. Hurley Medical Center Pediatrician Dr.

More than 2 million Michigan residents receive Social Security benefits.(401kcalculator.org/Flickr)

LANSING, Mich. - Michigan's March primary is right around the corner, and some voters say it's time for the presidential candidates to "Take a Stand" on the future of Social Security. "Take a Stand" is the name of an AARP campaign encouraging White House contenders to go beyond soundbites and mean

According to the American Heart Association, one-in-three women will die of heart disease, about 46 women in Michigan each day. (Pixabay)

LANSING, Mich. - Michiganders are reminded to keep hearts on their minds as February begins, and not just the Valentine kind. It's American Heart Month, an annual observance to bring awareness to cardiovascular disease, the nation's number one killer. Anna Pitt of Hemlock says she's lucky to be a

After the city switched its water source, Flint residents were exposed to toxic levels of lead. (Alvimann/Morguefile)

LANSING, Mich. - With a federal investigation now under way into the Flint water crisis, pressure is mounting for complete disclosure from the governor's office. Flint residents were exposed to toxic levels of lead after the city switched its water supply source from Lake Huron to the Flint River

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