Newscasts

PNS Daily News - July 26, 2017 


Here’s a look at some of our stories: 20 hours of Senate legislative debate could mean the end of Obamacare; the Justice Department once again takes aim at sanctuary cities; and a push for equality as landmark legislation marks a milestone.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MO: Sustainable Agriculture

Corn crops in Missouri are being studied through the use of robot technology, which can pinpoint problems in individual plants. (missouri.edu)

COLUMBIS, Mo. -- While many people are working hard to prevent or at least slow climate change, some Missouri scientists are trying to offset some of the problems they say are inevitable. The University of Missouri received a $20 million grant from the National Science Foundation in 2014 to study

During the Dust Bowl years Missouri had the highest rate of soil erosion in the nation. (Missouri.gov)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Advocates say all Missourians benefit from a tax that's been around since the 1980s. Back then, voters approved a one-tenth of one percent tax that is split between the Soil and Water Conservation District and the state park system. Last month Gov. Jay Nixon set the Novembe

Animal welfare advocates say regulation of factory farms is needed to protect public health, the environment and the animals themselves. (National Institute of Health)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - It's been a busy year for animal-rights advocates in Missouri. They've been fighting nearly two dozen bills, all being considered in this last week of the legislative session. Bob Baker, executive director of the Missouri Alliance for Animal Legislation, said most are aimed at

Thirty years ago, Missouri had the second highest erosion rate in the nation. The Department of Natural Resources says conservation practices save the soil. Photo courtesy of: DNR

ST. LOUIS, Mo. - The combination of last year's record drought and this year's heavy spring rains has scientists wondering if efforts to restore Missouri farmland are going to waste. Thirty years ago, Missouri had one of the worst soil-erosion rates in the nation, but conservation practices over the

ST. LOUIS - Missourians may not realize it, but some farming practices in the state are threatening aquatic life in the Gulf of Mexico, where a growing area of pollution is causing concern among environmentalists. Scientists say that an area of the Gulf of some 7000 square miles, larger than the sta

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Rural family farmers and independent producers across Missouri and the nation say they are tired of waiting on the federal government to implement a new set of competitive rules for the marketplace. The new rules, designed to level the playing field between large meatpackers a

DEXTER, MO. - Missouri FFA students will soon be in the field with farmers to learn how cutting-edge science on the farm could help the Gulf of Mexico. The program involves testing corn stalks for nitrogen, allowing farmers to maintain maximum crop production while reducing the fertilizer pollution

St. Louis, MO - An environmental advocate says a "flaming bag of poop" has been thrown on the state Capitol steps, with finalization by the Environmental Protection Agency of a rule meant to protect water quality by requiring concentrated animal feeding operations or "CAFOs" to safely manage manure.

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