Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - December 13, 2017 


Alabama elects Democrat Doug Jones to the U.S. Senate; also on our rundown; A court victory for tribes and environmental groups fighting uranium mining in the Grand Canyon; and Seattle appears headed towards a police accountability initiative for 2018.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MO: Water

Inadequate sewage systems destroy the habitats of the Ozark hellbender salamander. (Jeromy Applegate/USFWS)

ST. LOUIS – It can be challenging to make people care about an endangered species of giant salamander that goes by names including the Ozark hellbender and the snot otter. But environmentalists in Missouri are calling upon officials to recognize that the ample amphibian's ranks are dwindling b

Environmental groups warn that some of the Trump administration's earliest actions could send Missouri's asthma rates even higher. (sierraclub.org)

ST. LOUIS - Environmental groups are warning that Missouri's asthma problems may only get worse if the Trump administration continues in the same direction as it did in its first 100 hours. Across the country, a coalition of groups has launched "100 Hours of Action" to oppose what they see as aggre

President-elect Donald Trump has said he'll scrap the Clean Power Plan, and that has those concerned about clean air and water worried. (Veronica Carter)

ST. LOUIS – Things have been pretty charged in this country since the presidential election, and many people are worried about the future when it comes to the economy, health care and the environment. The Sierra Club and Webster University held a forum this week to let students, environmenta

During the Dust Bowl years Missouri had the highest rate of soil erosion in the nation. (Missouri.gov)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Advocates say all Missourians benefit from a tax that's been around since the 1980s. Back then, voters approved a one-tenth of one percent tax that is split between the Soil and Water Conservation District and the state park system. Last month Gov. Jay Nixon set the Novembe

Extensive testing is being done for radioactive contamination in neighborhoods around St. Louis thanks to citizens who made their voices heard. (Earth Island Journal)

ST. LOUIS - In 1942, Mallinckrodt Chemical Works in St Louis began secretly processing uranium for the U.S. government. By the time it wrapped up, 50,000 tons had been produced. Fast-forward decades later, and social media has become a way for people who have lost touch with each other to communica

Changes in climate mean changes in habitat for Missouri's hunters and anglers. (Missouri Chapter, Sierra Club)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Extreme swings in weather conditions can lead to major changes in the environment, and as trout season opens next week in Missouri, this year's winter flooding could mean changes for sportsmen. University of Missouri cooperative associate professor Craig Paukert says the maj

PHOTO: Coal ash, which is the waste material left behind from burning coal, is at the center of controversy in several Missouri communities, where there are fears toxic chemicals could leak into groundwater. Photo courtesy of Sierra Club Missouri Chapter.

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – According to the first ever federal standards on coal ash, the toxic waste from burning coal should not be dumped in landfills on unstable terrain because of the risk of groundwater contamination. That's why environmental and health advocates are unhappy as Missouri utilit

PHOTO: If approved, the Grain Belt Express transmission line would bring wind energy from Kansas to Missouri, Illinois and points east. Supporters say it would also carry environmental and economic benefits to the state. Photo credit: Kevin_P/morguefile.com.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – It appears the winds of change are blowing in Missouri, as more people speak out in favor of a plan to build a high-voltage wind energy transmission line through the state. Jim Turner, executive committee chair of the Missouri Chapter of the Sierra Club, says the line, whi

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