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PNS Daily Newscast - April 19, 2018 


A contentious Farm Bill heads to U.S. House for debate. Also on our rundown: gaps cited in protections for small-business employees and nonprofit volunteers; plus some warning signs, that increased youth activism may not correspond to voter turnout.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MO: Water

CAFOs house large numbers of pigs, chickens, cows or other farm animals in what are described as

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Missouri has seen a rise in concentrated animal feeding operations or CAFOs, whether they produce cows, hogs or chickens. Now, residents and environmental groups are concerned about a bill they say will take away local governments' ability to put public-health protections in pl

The Mississippi River separates Illinois and Missouri.  (Ken Lund/Flickr)

ST. LOUIS – Environmental regulators are racing to find an even balance in the ongoing battle over the heights of flood-control levees. The Army Corps of Engineers has figured out what locals have long suspected – when one town tries to protect itself against flooding, the problem gets

Coal ash is produced when power plants burn coal, and Missouri lawmakers are trying to decide whether the state should create its own regulations for coal-ash waste. (Pixabay)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Environmental groups warn that a bill now in the Missouri House of Representatives would weaken the state's protections against groundwater contamination from coal ash. Supporters of Senate Bill 917 by Sen. Sandy Crawford, R-Buffalo, have said the state of Missouri needs its o

Inadequate sewage systems destroy the habitats of the Ozark hellbender salamander. (Jeromy Applegate/USFWS)

ST. LOUIS – It can be challenging to make people care about an endangered species of giant salamander that goes by names including the Ozark hellbender and the snot otter. But environmentalists in Missouri are calling upon officials to recognize that the ample amphibian's ranks are dwindling b

Environmental groups warn that some of the Trump administration's earliest actions could send Missouri's asthma rates even higher. (sierraclub.org)

ST. LOUIS - Environmental groups are warning that Missouri's asthma problems may only get worse if the Trump administration continues in the same direction as it did in its first 100 hours. Across the country, a coalition of groups has launched "100 Hours of Action" to oppose what they see as aggre

President-elect Donald Trump has said he'll scrap the Clean Power Plan, and that has those concerned about clean air and water worried. (Veronica Carter)

ST. LOUIS – Things have been pretty charged in this country since the presidential election, and many people are worried about the future when it comes to the economy, health care and the environment. The Sierra Club and Webster University held a forum this week to let students, environmenta

During the Dust Bowl years Missouri had the highest rate of soil erosion in the nation. (Missouri.gov)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Advocates say all Missourians benefit from a tax that's been around since the 1980s. Back then, voters approved a one-tenth of one percent tax that is split between the Soil and Water Conservation District and the state park system. Last month Gov. Jay Nixon set the Novembe

Extensive testing is being done for radioactive contamination in neighborhoods around St. Louis thanks to citizens who made their voices heard. (Earth Island Journal)

ST. LOUIS - In 1942, Mallinckrodt Chemical Works in St Louis began secretly processing uranium for the U.S. government. By the time it wrapped up, 50,000 tons had been produced. Fast-forward decades later, and social media has become a way for people who have lost touch with each other to communica

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