Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 23, 2017 


Today on the rundown: the Senate GOP releases a draft of their health-care bill; Tropical Storm Cindy is bringing heavy rainfall to the South; and could Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ “tough on drugs” approach fuel mass incarceration?

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MT: Hunger/Food/Nutrition

The Montana Food Bank Network works with 140 partners across the state to provide meals to kids over the summer. (Leon Neal/Getty Images)

MISSOULA, Mont. – During the summer months, children need food assistance more than ever. One in five children in Montana lives in a food insecure home, meaning he or she isn't sure where a next meal is coming from. Many of these children rely on free and reduced meals during the school ye

Montana added nearly 100,000 acres of organic farmland since 2016, according to a new report. (storebukkebruse/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. - The last few years have been a growing season for organic farming in the United States. According to the Mercaris Organic Acreage Report, organic farmland reached more than four million acres this year. Montana saw a 30-percent jump over the last two years, giving it the second-most

The BackPack assistance program is designed to help the nearly 48,000 children who are food insecure in Montana.(and the rest/flickr)

MISSOULA, Mont. – Thanksgiving is a time when families get together and eat wonderful food. But some Montanans are less fortunate during the holidays. One in seven people in Montana struggles with hunger, including nearly 48,000 children who aren't sure where their next meal will come from.

A former environmental lawyer has written a book that says that when done correctly, livestock grazing can have some benefits for the land. (Scott Bauer/USDA)

BILLINGS, Mont. - The ancient plains of Montana once hosted herds of animals that grazed the land. Now, cattle and other domesticated animals do that work. According to former environmental lawyer and author Nicolette Hahn Niman, the planet actually is grazed far less than it used to be. Her book "

Blain Hjerthaas speaks at the first Soil Summit on Saturday about a practice called

BILLINGS, Mont. – If you want to get higher yields from a farm, start with the health of the soil. That's one rule being shared by a speaker at Northern Plains Resource Council's first Soil Summit, which takes place in Billings on Saturday and is open to the public. Blain Hjertaas, a sustain

Big Sandy farmer Kelly Rutledge is in Washington, D.C., to press members of Congress on agricultural issues close to home. Credit: Montana Farmers Union.

GREAT FALLS, Mont. – Food labeling, sage grouse, renewable-energy standards and new trade markets. It's a long list of priorities for Montana farmers and ranchers visiting Washington D.C. this week on the annual "fly-in" to meet with members of Congress. Big Sandy farmer Kelly Rutledge with t

A federal court says the pesticide sulfoxaflor should not have been registered because it can kill bees and other pollinators. Credit: Deborah C. Smith.

HELENA, Mont. - A pesticide that kills bees should not have been cleared for agricultural use by the Environmental Protection Agency, according to a federal appeals court. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday that Dow Chemical's sulfoxaflor was not thoroughly researched when it comes t

PHOTO: Billings may be in the heart of farm country, but the region imports between 90 and 95 percent of its food. A farm and food systems expert presents ideas on Tuesday for how local food can become an economic development tool. Photo credit: LifeOfPix.com

BILLINGS, Mont. - Billings may be in the heart of farm country, but the region imports between 90 and 95 percent of its food. Harvard University economics professor Ken Meter, who has helped communities in more than three dozen states set up local food systems, says Billings isn't alone in that st

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