Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 17, 2017 


On our nationwide rundown; President Trump disbands two economic councils as CEO’s resign in protest; we will tell you why Iowa, like Trump, has bias issues; plus land trusts are a prime spot to view Monday’s solar eclipse.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Public Lands/Wilderness

Sunset Rock, protected by the Highlands-Cashiers Land Trust, is said to be one of the best places to view Monday's total solar eclipse. (Highlands-Cashiers Land Trust)

HIGHLANDS, N.C. – Monday may be the closest thing to time standing still, as thousands of people flock to parts of North Carolina that are in the path of totality for the solar eclipse in the afternoon. Sunset Rock at Ravenel Park in Highlands is one of the top spots for eclipse viewing. Tha

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico caused billions in damage, and a similar accident is what opponents to oil and gas exploration fear. (Florida Sea Grant/flickr)

BEAUFORT, N.C. – Citizens have two more days to weigh in on restarting the process of offshore drilling on North Carolina's coast. The Trump administration announced it was restarting the process of oil and gas leases earlier this year after the Obama administration put those ocean areas off l

The Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy helped protect the Weaverville watershed that provides drinking water and a home to thousands of wildlife. (SAHC)

WEAVERVILLE, N.C. -- North Carolina's abundant water sources provide drinking water to thousands of people, but protecting the quality of that water starts on the land. That fact has guided a public/private partnership in one part of the state. The Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy recent

Waterway restoration to repair damage from Hurricane Matthew is moving ahead because of a public-private partnership. (Hurricane Matthew/flickr)

WARSAW, N.C. – It's been a little over 10 months since Hurricane Matthew ravaged parts of North Carolina causing flooding in river basins across the state. Although the water has receded, the cleanup continues and the state is partnering with the nonprofit group Resource Institute to restore

Hundreds of thousands float the New River in Ashe County ever year. (New River Conservancy)

WEST JEFFERSON, N.C. -- For thousands of North Carolinians and visitors, the weekend undoubtedly included a float on one of the hundreds of miles of rivers in the state. North Carolina is home to 17 major river basins, including the oldest river in the nation and second-oldest in the world: the New

The Clean Water Rule restored federal protections to 56 percent of North Carolina waterways and wetlands, including drinking-water sources for 4.7 million people. (SimonQ/Flickr)

RALEIGH, N.C. - The Trump administration on Tuesday launched its repeal plans for the Clean Water Rule, sending ripples of concern throughout the conservation community about protecting drinking water, in North Carolina and across the country. However, insiders say that's just part of the story. Th

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is taking public comment on the future of the Red Wolf Recovery Program. (Valerie/Flickr)

COLUMBIA, N.C. — North Carolinians are being asked to weigh in on the future of a landmark program responsible for bringing an animal back from near extinction. The Red Wolf Recovery Program has been in operation for more than 30 years, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has taken steps

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the most visited in the nation, by more people than the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone combined. (Steve Harwood/Flickr)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - More than 35 hunting, fishing and outdoor groups today sent a letter to the members of North Carolina's congressional delegation calling on them to defend public lands in the state and the rest of the country. The demand from organizations representing more than 100,000 stakeholde

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