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PNS Daily News - March 29, 2017 


Here’s a look at what’s making news today: Trump follows through on promises to dismantle climate policies; the head of the White House-Russia investigation says he won’t step down; and coast-to-coast opposition grows to Session’s sanctuary cities stance.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Rural/Farming

A aerial view of Old Orchard Creek Farm in Ashe County is one example of land protected by land conservancy. (Old Orchard Creek)

FRANKLIN, N.C. – With less than two weeks to go before Christmas, North Carolinians are busy planning their holiday menus. And with hundreds of small farms around the state providing everything from eggnog to beef, groups hope folks go local when cooking this month. Many of the state's small

Resource Institute is engaged in projects around North Carolina to improve water quality for recreation, human consumption and agriculture. (David Lanham/flickr.com)

RALEIGH, N.C. -- It's a literal trickle-down effect: water that runs off the mountains of western North Carolina flows into streams that work their way across the state to the coast. And a joint effort between the state, feds, nonprofits and local land owners is working to improve water quality. M

Red wolves are being mistaken by some hunters for coyotes, a problem made worse as deer season picks up in North Carolina. (Land Between the Lakes/flickr.com)

COLUMBIA, N.C. – Deer hunting, a sporting tradition enjoyed by thousands of people in North Carolina, is underway in most parts of the state, but conservation groups are concerned that one endangered animal is getting caught in the crossfire. Red wolves, who live in the eastern parts of the

RiverLink's newly installed river access point at Pearson Bridge in Asheville opens up recreation opportunities for all kinds of watercraft. (PEarson/RiverLink)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – Over the weekend thousands of people flocked to North Carolina's beaches, rivers and lakes to enjoy the recreation the state’s natural landscape offers. But nothing can taint a day on the water more than unsightly and even unsanitary conditions. The 23 land trusts i

The green swirls of water seen here in the Chowan River are an example of the impact of too much nutrients that can occur in North Carolina waters. (Heather Deck, Pamlico-Tar River Foundation)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Agriculture is big business in North Carolina, and while the farms across the state add to the economy and resources, the waste generated in the form of animal waste and fertilizer runoff has the potential to impact the state's water quality. For the past 20 years, regulati

Farmland in western North Carolina is benefiting from state and federal funds for stream water management in a project organized by the Resource Institute. (Harris)

ELKIN, N.C. – Streams meander through North Carolina’s western mountains and the farms that dot the map, regardless of property lines. And now those farm owners are connecting with water conservation groups to do what the farmers can to maintain and protect the waterways. Eddie Harri

North Carolina's butterflies and other pollinators such as bees and hummingbirds are impacted by industrial and agricultural development. (Angelique Hjarding)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – North Carolina's Butterfly Highway isn't going to shorten your nightly commute, but it will make it more scenic. The project began a year ago in the Charlotte area as an effort to increase the network of pollinator habitats in the community, and make it easier for butterfli

Ridgefield Farm in Clay County, home of Brasstown Beef, is under an agricultural easement with the Mainspring Conservation Trust. (Mainspring)

BRASSTOWN, N.C. - Farmers' markets are in full swing across North Carolina, with tables full of locally-sourced produce, meats and crafts. In addition to water, sunshine and sweat equity to create the bounty of crops, land also is needed to meet the demand. That's what North Carolina's land trusts

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