Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 23, 2017 


Today on the rundown: the Senate GOP releases a draft of their health-care bill; Tropical Storm Cindy is bringing heavy rainfall to the South; and could Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ “tough on drugs” approach fuel mass incarceration?

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Water

Evidence of cancer-causing chemicals has been found downstream of Duke Energy power plants in North Carolia. (Momkay/flickr)

RALEIGH, N.C. — North Carolina water won't have additional exposure to a potentially dangerous chemical. Duke Energy is no longer petitioning the state for permission to use additional quantities of bromide in its coal plant operations. Bromide is a chemical that forms cancer-causing trihalo

Reefmakers are made of limestone, which provides a porous yet durable substance to place along the tidal coastline. (Atlantic Reefmaker)

OUTER BANKS, N.C. -- Erosion of North Carolina's shoreline is a growing problem, as development, boating traffic and extreme weather deplete the natural protections of estuaries and marine habitat. But the newest technology in artificial reefs is set to change that, and it's already being used in pa

New Belgium Brewery, headquartered in Fort Collins, Colo., chose Asheville, N.C., as its second location, partly because of the state's water quality. (Joe Flood/Flickr)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – North Carolina's clean water is a valuable commodity for thousands of businesses across the state, including New Belgium Brewing in Asheville. The fourth-largest craft brewery in the U.S. is one of 234 businesses that this week joined an amicus brief urging a federal court

Resource Institute is engaged in projects around North Carolina to improve water quality for recreation, human consumption and agriculture. (David Lanham/flickr.com)

RALEIGH, N.C. -- It's a literal trickle-down effect: water that runs off the mountains of western North Carolina flows into streams that work their way across the state to the coast. And a joint effort between the state, feds, nonprofits and local land owners is working to improve water quality. M

Forest canopies are believed to be extremely important in the success of stream restoration projects. (Amy Meredith/flickr.com)

DOBSON, N.C. – When it comes to stream restoration in North Carolina, much attention often is paid to restoring natural stream function, but a growing body of evidence points to the importance of "looking up" when it comes to such projects. Canopies are the term used to describe the foliage

A new report from the National Wildlife Federation highlights the vulnerabilities of North Carolina's coastline if global warming and sea level rise aren't addressed. (Jon Cain/flickr.com)

OUTERBANKS, N.C. — With 300 miles of shoreline, North Carolina is one of the states most vulnerable to sea-level rise. According to a report from the National Wildlife Federation, sea levels could rise by six feet or more by 2100 if steps aren't taken soon to cut greenhouse gas emissions and s

North Carolina lawmakers adjourned for the year without taking action on a bill that would require and fund testing of water for lead in schools and daycare centers in the state. (Morguefile.com)

RALEIGH, N.C. - Child advocates say it's a step backwards in protecting North Carolina's children against exposure to lead in drinking water. The State Assembly adjourned without taking action on a House Bill 1074 that would have required and funded lead testing in the drinking water of every school

Storage ponds such as this one in the Lower Neuse basin contain agricultural waste, and environmental groups are concerned about the amount of waste seeping into area waterways and groundwater. (Graves)

NEW BERN, N.C. — The agriculture industry is one of the top contributors to the economy in North Carolina, but according to a new

1 of 9 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »