Newscasts

PNS Daily News - April 24, 2017 


We're highlighting several stories in today's news including: Congress returns from recess to a showdown over a border wall; immigrants may face the collateral damage of crime lab misconduct; and President Trump expected to move forward on offshore drilling.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Children's Issues

The proposal to reduce funding for Medicaid being discussed today in Congress could greatly impact the availability of health care for North Carolina. (UW Health)

RALEIGH, N.C. -- According to the most recent data from NC Child, 96 percent of children in North Carolina have health insurance. But their access to care is uncertain as the U.S. House votes Thursday on a bill that would repeal the Affordable Care Act and greatly reduce funding for Medicaid. The

President Donald Trump's immigration order has prompted families who have adopted children internationally to double-check that the child's U.S. citizenship paperwork is in order. (Stephen Melkisethian/Flickr)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. -- An Asheville mom had an unpleasant surprise this week when she called the Social Security Administration and discovered her adopted son is still listed as a "legal alien.” Although Amber Ukena had filed the proper paperwork almost 10 years ago when she brought her son home

A new partnership in the Triangle aims to encourage early-childhood reading and proficiency through a $700,000 investment. (ThomasLife/Flickr)

RALEIGH, N.C. – More than one million adults in North Carolina have difficulty with reading and writing and a new initiative announced this week in the state aims to address illiteracy early in life. The North Carolina Early Childhood Foundation is working with United Way of the Greater Trian

North Carolina is currently one of only two states nationwide that automatically tries 16- and 17-year-olds as adults. (Crawford Learmonth/Flickr)

RALEIGH, N.C. – The tide may be turning when it come to prosecuting all 16- and 17-year-olds in North Carolina as adults. This month, a commission made up of members representing legal and law enforcement perspectives held its final meeting and declared that raising the age in North Carolina i

North Carolina will work with NC Child to take steps toward studying links to paid leave and a reduction in child mortality. (Stephan Hochhause/flickr.com)

RALEIGH, N.C. — Access to paid leave for North Carolina workers could impact more than just a parent's quality of life. A possible link between child mortality and access to child care and paid leave is prompting the state to take a closer look. This week, the State Fatality Prevention Team

North Carolina lawmakers adjourned for the year without taking action on a bill that would require and fund testing of water for lead in schools and daycare centers in the state. (Morguefile.com)

RALEIGH, N.C. - Child advocates say it's a step backwards in protecting North Carolina's children against exposure to lead in drinking water. The State Assembly adjourned without taking action on a House Bill 1074 that would have required and funded lead testing in the drinking water of every school

A report from NC Child recommends improved access to health coverage for women in order to increase the health of the state's babies. (Morguefile.com)

RALEIGH, N.C. – Fewer babies are dying in North Carolina – with infant mortality decreasing by 40 percent in the last 20 years, according to a new report by the support group NC Child. The organization says it also found that women's access to physical and mental health care plays a big

Parents in Asheville who are active in their schools are upset over recent administration changes within the school system.  (Claxton Elementary)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. - Just how much control do parents have over what happens at their child's public school in North Carolina? That's the question Asheville parents are trying to find out as they protest a series of administration changes put in place by their system's school board. The reassignments

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