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PNS Daily News - June 28, 2017 


Here’s a look at what’s making headlines: Republicans scramble after a vote on health care delayed; a Clean Water Rule repeal comes under scrutiny; and a chemical in a common weed killer declared a carcinogen by California.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ND: Health Issues

A new grant in North Dakota helps first responders coordinate with hospitals for faster care of stroke victims. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

BISMARCK, N.D. – A new grant will help streamline North Dakota's response system for stroke victims, especially in rural parts of the state. The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust is teaming up with the American Heart Association to fund the Association's Mission: Lifeline Strok

Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among people aged 15 to 24 years in North Dakota. (Jared Keener/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – One of the most disturbing figures in new data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation is that North Dakota teens are three times as likely to commit suicide as their peers nationwide. Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year-olds in the state. Alison Tra

A Congressional Budget Office report found 23 million fewer Americans could have health care by 2026 if the American Health Care Act is passed. (skeeze/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. - AARP representatives from North Dakota and across the country are in the nation's capital today to ask members of Congress to consider older Americans during their health-care deliberations. AARP North Dakota President Kathi Schwan is meeting with Sens. John Hoeven, R-N.D., and Hei

About 4.7 percent of doctors in North Dakota are part of the H-1B visa program, the highest rate in the country. (sasint/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Medical professionals in North Dakota are facing pressure from all sides, feeling the pains of a growing shortage of doctors and potential changes to a visa program that helps supply doctors and wondering what will happen to health insurance at the federal level. President D

North Dakota's two U.S. senators disagreed on the fate of a BLM rule that prevents methane-gas venting and flaring at oil developments on public and tribal land. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- North Dakota tribes say the U.S. Senate's decision not to overturn a rule requiring energy developers to limit methane gas leaks and flaring on tribal land is a win for their health and the environment. However, the state's Senators split their votes on that decision. In a statem

The North Dakota Legislature passed one piece of legislation aimed at helping caregivers this session.(Public.Resource.Org/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. — Family caregivers in the Peace Garden State went 1-for-2 in bills supporting their work from the North Dakota Legislature. The bills were designed to help the state's roughly 62,000 family caregivers. The first, House Bill 1038, upped the resources for caregivers to get rest

High blood pressure can be an indicator of a person's risk for stroke. (blausen/Wikimedia Commons)

FARGO, N. D. – May is National Stroke Awareness Month, and health groups and medical professionals are encouraging people to assess their own risk factors for stroke. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in North Dakota, but is largely preventable if people stay on top of such in

April is Physical Activity Month, a good time to commit to a daily walk and other moves to get into better shape. (Lindsey G/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – April is Physical Activity Month, and heart health and fitness experts in North Dakota say, 'Get up and move around!' As Americans are more sedentary, the risks increase for heart disease, stroke and other serious health conditions. Heart disease is already the leading cause

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