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PNS Daily News - March 29, 2017 


Here’s a look at what’s making news today: Trump follows through on promises to dismantle climate policies; the head of the White House-Russia investigation says he won’t step down; and coast-to-coast opposition grows to Session’s sanctuary cities stance.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ND: Public Lands/Wilderness

New federal rules could lead to cuts in waste gas flaring from North Dakota oil fields, but the state and some oil and gas producers have opposed them. (WildEarth Guardians/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- The Bureau of Land Management issued some new rules that are irking the oil and gas industry, but the agency says they were proposed for their health and environmental benefits. The regulations are expected to reduce the amount of gas flared or released from oil wells. During the

Native Americans have been protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline since April. (Red Warrior Camp)

BISMARCK, N.D. – The controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project could be permanently shut down today, pending a federal judge's decision. Members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North and South Dakota are suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Tribal members say the agency issued impro

A group of Native American youth are running 2,000 miles to protest construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (iStockphoto)

BISMARCK, N.D. - A 2,000-mile journey to fight for clean water and land is making its way through Maryland. Native American youths are running from North Dakota to Washington, D.C., to protest a pipeline that would cross several states and could threaten tribal lands. The Dakota Access Pipeline woul

In 2014, about 200 industrial-sized garbage bags full of oil production waste were found in an abandoned gas station in Noonan, ND. (Dakota Resource Council)

BISMARCK, N.D. – After North Dakota's Health Council approved new toxic waste rules during what turned out to be an illegal public meeting last year, environmental groups are urging concerned residents to weigh in at a do-over meeting next Tuesday. Groups including the Dakota Resource Counci

Supporters of new oil and gas pipeline regulations say if they're adopted North Dakota could become a safer state for industry workers and for farmland owners. (iStockphoto)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- North Dakota energy officials today are poised to make some serious changes to how the state regulates its growing network of oil, wastewater and methane gas pipelines. The North Dakota Industrial Commission is deciding whether to finalize new regulations aimed at improving how the

Some North Dakota tribal leaders are backing plans to clarify when oil companies owe royalties on flared gas. (iStockphoto)

BISMARCK, N.D. - As federal regulators consider new rules to curb gas flaring at oil wells on public and tribal lands, North Dakotans are being asked to weigh in at public meeting in Dickinson today. In January, the Bureau of Land Management proposed the new regulations. This comes after years of

The endangered pallid sturgeon is being blocked from reaching its natural breeding grounds on the Yellowstone River. (Byrd Vernon/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

BISMARCK, N. D. – Conservationists say the fate of an ancient fish species is now in the hands of the U.S. government. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation are combing through public comments about a dam project along the Yellowstone River. At issue is the Diversion

Scientists say they found a new Lyme-disease causing bacteria in several Midwestern states, including North Dakota. (iStockphoto)

BISMARCK, N.D. - Nature lovers beware. Scientists believe they have found a new species of bacteria that can cause Lyme disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, doctors found at least six cases in patients only in the upper Midwest. Microbiologist Dr. Jeannine Peterse

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