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PNS Daily News - September 25, 2017 


Here’s a look at what we’re highlighting: new travel restrictions announced for eight countries; research highlights a drop in uninsured kids; and weekend protests over the House Speaker’s tax plan.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ND: Toxics

Illegal dumping of radioactive waste from oil wells has been rampant in North Dakota. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

FARGO, N.D. - The North Dakota Department of Health could decide as soon as this week whether to grant a permit for a truck that transports and processes radioactive waste from oil wells. The request has been met with concern from critics, who say it lacks details and transparency. At a public hear

Trihalomethane, a compound group linked to cancer, is found at levels above the healthy limit in the drinking water of 600,000 North Dakotans, according to a new report. (Arcaion/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. – A new report is giving North Dakotans a clearer look at what is in their tap water. The Environmental Working Group's Tap Water Database lets people search their zip code to find out what contaminants utilities have found in their drinking water. Sonya Lunder, a senior resea

New federal rules could lead to cuts in waste gas flaring from North Dakota oil fields, but the state and some oil and gas producers have opposed them. (WildEarth Guardians/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- The Bureau of Land Management issued some new rules that are irking the oil and gas industry, but the agency says they were proposed for their health and environmental benefits. The regulations are expected to reduce the amount of gas flared or released from oil wells. During the

Chairman Archambault (left) and Chief Arvol Looking Horse are involved in the latest fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline that also spotlights decades of racial discrimination against Native populations in North Dakota. (Photo by Jenni Monet)

BISMARCK, N.D. - For many members of the Lakota Sioux Tribe, the battle against the Dakota Access Pipeline is just the latest symptom of a longstanding racial divide in North Dakota. Native Americans in the state are jailed and live in poverty at much higher rates than their white neighbors, and so

Native Americans have been protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline since April. (Red Warrior Camp)

BISMARCK, N.D. – The controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project could be permanently shut down today, pending a federal judge's decision. Members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North and South Dakota are suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Tribal members say the agency issued impro

A group of Native American youth are running 2,000 miles to protest construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (iStockphoto)

BISMARCK, N.D. - A 2,000-mile journey to fight for clean water and land is making its way through Maryland. Native American youths are running from North Dakota to Washington, D.C., to protest a pipeline that would cross several states and could threaten tribal lands. The Dakota Access Pipeline woul

In 2014, about 200 industrial-sized garbage bags full of oil production waste were found in an abandoned gas station in Noonan, ND. (Dakota Resource Council)

BISMARCK, N.D. – After North Dakota's Health Council approved new toxic waste rules during what turned out to be an illegal public meeting last year, environmental groups are urging concerned residents to weigh in at a do-over meeting next Tuesday. Groups including the Dakota Resource Counci

Supporters of new oil and gas pipeline regulations say if they're adopted North Dakota could become a safer state for industry workers and for farmland owners. (iStockphoto)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- North Dakota energy officials today are poised to make some serious changes to how the state regulates its growing network of oil, wastewater and methane gas pipelines. The North Dakota Industrial Commission is deciding whether to finalize new regulations aimed at improving how the

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