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PNS Daily Newscast - August 17, 2017 


On our nationwide rundown; President Trump disbands two economic councils as CEO’s resign in protest; we will tell you why Iowa, like Trump, has bias issues; plus land trusts are a prime spot to view Monday’s solar eclipse.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ND: Native American Issues

North Dakotans in the Bakken region, where oil production is most heavily concentrated, have reported health problems they believe are the result of air pollution. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – North Dakotans are still fighting air pollution, even as the Environmental Protection Agency takes the next steps toward removing regulations on methane-flaring at oil and gas well sites. A new report from the Dakota Resource Council finds methane is affecting local resident

Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among people aged 15 to 24 years in North Dakota. (Jared Keener/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – One of the most disturbing figures in new data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation is that North Dakota teens are three times as likely to commit suicide as their peers nationwide. Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year-olds in the state. Alison Tra

North Dakota's two U.S. senators disagreed on the fate of a BLM rule that prevents methane-gas venting and flaring at oil developments on public and tribal land. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- North Dakota tribes say the U.S. Senate's decision not to overturn a rule requiring energy developers to limit methane gas leaks and flaring on tribal land is a win for their health and the environment. However, the state's Senators split their votes on that decision. In a statem

Oil and gas companies lose about $330 million a year to methane venting, flaring and leaking on public lands. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Congress could decide as soon as this week the fate of the Methane and Waste Prevention Rule, and North Dakotans who see the greatest impact from this regulation are speaking up. Members of Congress are considering repealing the Bureau of Land Management rule, which limits t

New federal rules could lead to cuts in waste gas flaring from North Dakota oil fields, but the state and some oil and gas producers have opposed them. (WildEarth Guardians/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. -- The Bureau of Land Management issued some new rules that are irking the oil and gas industry, but the agency says they were proposed for their health and environmental benefits. The regulations are expected to reduce the amount of gas flared or released from oil wells. During the

New census data shows North Dakota saw the biggest drop in child poverty, but large disparities still exist, especially for Native populations. (iStockphoto)

BISMARCK, N.D. - North Dakota had the biggest drop in the country's child-poverty rate, but child well-being experts say there's more work to do, especially for Native families. The census data shows North Dakota saw a 20-percent drop in the state's child-poverty rate from 2011 to 2015. Experts po

Chairman Archambault (left) and Chief Arvol Looking Horse are involved in the latest fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline that also spotlights decades of racial discrimination against Native populations in North Dakota. (Photo by Jenni Monet)

BISMARCK, N.D. - For many members of the Lakota Sioux Tribe, the battle against the Dakota Access Pipeline is just the latest symptom of a longstanding racial divide in North Dakota. Native Americans in the state are jailed and live in poverty at much higher rates than their white neighbors, and so

Native Americans have been protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline since April. (Red Warrior Camp)

BISMARCK, N.D. – The controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project could be permanently shut down today, pending a federal judge's decision. Members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North and South Dakota are suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Tribal members say the agency issued impro

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