Newscasts

PNS Daily News - June 28, 2017 


Here’s a look at what’s making headlines: Republicans scramble after a vote on health care delayed; a Clean Water Rule repeal comes under scrutiny; and a chemical in a common weed killer declared a carcinogen by California.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NE: Consumer Issues

Medical experts say family-planning services help women plan for children and avoid unintended pregnancy. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – After weeks of closed-door meetings, Senate Republicans released their legislation last week to repeal Obamacare. GOP leaders claim the plan will stabilize insurance markets, remove mandates and provide flexibility for states. But Janele George, director of federal reproducti

Accessing financial resources and land are among the challenges faced by beginning farmers. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Military veterans in Nebraska who are new to farming, or just interested in finding out about it, have an opportunity this week to see how others have turned their military skills into a career in agriculture. The Answering the Call conference on Thursday in Seward offers an

The share of total property tax paid on agricultural land in Nebraska increased from more than 18 percent in 2005 to nearly 30 percent in 2014. (Bradly Gordon/Flickr)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Calls for property tax relief have dominated budget talks in Nebraska this year, and a new report examines how the tax burden has shifted more heavily onto agricultural property. According to research from the Center for Rural Affairs, from 2005 to 2014, property tax collections a

A property tax relief proposal would adjust the way farmland and ranchland are valued for tax purposes. (Mikael Wiman/Flickr)

This is the fourth in a series of reports that examines Nebraska’s budget priorities: who stands to benefit and who could lose out? LINCOLN, Neb. – Nebraska lawmakers have a full plate as they hammer out a state budget and a new tax package. A major issue is how to provide relief to t

Critics contend a freeze on child care subsidies in Nebraska would hinder the future academic success of vulnerable children. (Pixabay)

This is the third in a series of reports that examines Nebraska’s budget priorities: who stands to benefit and who could lose out? Note: From time to time we are able to provide Spanish versions of our stories, sent separately. This is one of those stories. Please advise if you would like to

Communities in Kansas and Oklahoma have faced many difficult choices in the years following massive tax cuts. (M. Kuhlman)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Four-day school weeks, reduced Medicaid reimbursements, cuts to programs that help home-bound seniors; those are just some of the tough choices communities in Kansas and Oklahoma have faced in the years following massive tax cuts. And their stories could be cautionary tax tales for

Some analysts say a proposed income tax cut only would benefit wealthy Nebraskans. (401(k) 2012/Flickr)

This is the first in a series of reports over the next several Mondays that examines Nebraska’s budget priorities: who stands to benefit and who could lose out? LINCOLN, Neb. – Nebraska lawmakers came into the session faced with a $1.2 billion budget shortfall, and while proposed income

Three out of four Nebraskans in an AARP survey approved of capping payday lenders' interest rates at 36 percent. (cohdra/morguefile)

LINCOLN, Neb. – State lawmakers heard testimony Tuesday on a bill that would beef up consumer protections in the payday-lending industry. While current Nebraska law allows payday lenders to charge borrowers up to 461 percent annual interest, Legislative Bill 194 would put a 36-percent cap on

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