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PNS Daily Newscast - April 28, 2017 


In focus on our rundown today: President Trump says he’ll “renegotiate” NAFTA rather than pull out; Texas groups oppose Congress’ second try at health care bill; and wildlife takes over a Florida school.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NE: Consumer Issues

A property tax relief proposal would adjust the way farmland and ranchland are valued for tax purposes. (Mikael Wiman/Flickr)

This is the fourth in a series of reports that examines Nebraska’s budget priorities: who stands to benefit and who could lose out? LINCOLN, Neb. – Nebraska lawmakers have a full plate as they hammer out a state budget and a new tax package. A major issue is how to provide relief to t

Critics contend a freeze on child care subsidies in Nebraska would hinder the future academic success of vulnerable children. (Pixabay)

This is the third in a series of reports that examines Nebraska’s budget priorities: who stands to benefit and who could lose out? Note: From time to time we are able to provide Spanish versions of our stories, sent separately. This is one of those stories. Please advise if you would like to

Communities in Kansas and Oklahoma have faced many difficult choices in the years following massive tax cuts. (M. Kuhlman)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Four-day school weeks, reduced Medicaid reimbursements, cuts to programs that help home-bound seniors; those are just some of the tough choices communities in Kansas and Oklahoma have faced in the years following massive tax cuts. And their stories could be cautionary tax tales for

Some analysts say a proposed income tax cut only would benefit wealthy Nebraskans. (401(k) 2012/Flickr)

This is the first in a series of reports over the next several Mondays that examines Nebraska’s budget priorities: who stands to benefit and who could lose out? LINCOLN, Neb. – Nebraska lawmakers came into the session faced with a $1.2 billion budget shortfall, and while proposed income

Three out of four Nebraskans in an AARP survey approved of capping payday lenders' interest rates at 36 percent. (cohdra/morguefile)

LINCOLN, Neb. – State lawmakers heard testimony Tuesday on a bill that would beef up consumer protections in the payday-lending industry. While current Nebraska law allows payday lenders to charge borrowers up to 461 percent annual interest, Legislative Bill 194 would put a 36-percent cap on

Nebraska lawmakers will consider a measure that caps interest rates on payday loans at 36 percent.<br />(Taber Andrew Bain/Flickr)

LINCOLN, Neb. – There's a new effort in Nebraska to break the cycle of debt that can trap borrowers in payday loans. Senators Lou Ann Linehan and Tony Vargas introduced legislation (LB 194) on Tuesday that aligns payday loans more closely with a traditional loan structure. Vargas says folks

Nebraska starts the New Year facing a nearly $900 million budget shortfall for its next state budget cycle. (Tax Credits/Flickr)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Nebraska rings in the New Year faced with a looming revenue shortfall – nearly $900 million heading into the next budget cycle for 2019. And while it's a touchy subject, some analysts say school-funding reform should be part of any budget discussions. Nebraska's schoo

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