Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 26, 2017 


Here's what we're following on today's rundown: a federal appeals court will not reinstate Trump’s revised travel ban; a shake up at the USDA could hurt rural America; and the body slamming of a reporter in Montana may be part of a bigger pattern of hostility toward journalists.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NY: Youth Issues

In 2016, students in New York City public schools experienced 1,263 arrests. (Steven Depolo/Flickr)

NEW YORK - Juvenile-justice advocates say New York City is spending hundreds of millions of dollars a year on a punitive approach to school discipline that is ineffective and harms students. According to a new report by the Center for Popular Democracy and the Urban Youth Collaborative, last year m

EOP and EOC students graduate at higher rates and with higher grade point averages than the general population. (college.library/flickr.com)

ALBANY, N.Y. – About 700 students from across New York traveled to Albany on Wednesday, asking lawmakers to fully fund programs that helped them prepare for college. Gov. Andrew Cuomo's executive budget calls for a $5 million cut in funding for the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) and a

New York has ended the use of solitary for 16- and 17-year-olds in state prisons, and the Onondaga County Justice Center has been ordered to do the same. (Officer Bimblebury/Wikimedia Commons)<br />

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – A federal judge has ordered the Justice Center in Syracuse to stop putting 16- and 17-year-olds in solitary confinement. The preliminary injunction issued Wednesday was granted in a lawsuit challenging the practice of punishing juveniles held in the adult jail by keeping the

People ordered to empty their pockets often then are arrested for having marijuana in public view. (houstondwiPhotos mp/flickr.com)

ALBANY, N.Y. -- A bill to seal the criminal records of New Yorkers arrested for marijuana possession has cleared the state Assembly. Personal possession of small amounts of marijuana was decriminalized in New York 40 years ago, but a loophole in the law allowing arrest for possession "in public vi

NYSUT Executive Vice President Andrew Pallotta, right, testifying in legislative budget hearings this week. (NYSUT)

ALBANY, N.Y. – Educators say the state is on the right track, but needs to invest more in higher education. Three weeks ago, Gov. Andrew Cuomo unveiled a plan to make the state and city university systems tuition free for low- and middle-income New Yorkers. Testifying at state budget heari

Critics say New York's many certification exams create unnecessary barriers to aspiring teachers. (Hagerty Ryan, USFWS/Pixnio)

ALBANY, N.Y. – The union for State University faculties is urging the Board of Regents to approve changes to the New York State teacher certification exam. A special task force has recommended several changes to the tests all teachers need to take to be certified in the state. Jamie Dangler,

The U.S. Justice Department has submitted a

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – The U.S. Justice Department has submitted a "statement of interest" in a lawsuit seeking to end the solitary confinement of juveniles in a New York jail. The lawsuit, filed by the New York Civil Liberties Union and Legal Services of Central New York, challenges the ongoing p

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., joined Gov. Andrew Cuomo for the announcement. (GovernorAndrewCuomo/Flickr)

NEW YORK – Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants college to be tuition-free for low- and middle-income New York families. The governor's proposal, which he calls the Excelsior Scholarship, would supplement existing state and federal tuition assistance programs to make attendance at any state or city two- o

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