Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 27, 2017 


In focus on our nationwide rundown; the Pentagon still trying to figure out how to respond to the latest Trump tweet to ban transgender Americans from serving in the armed forces; updates on the Affordable Care Act and state worker contracts, plus Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke heads to New Mexico to review another national monument.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - OR: Environment

Pesticides are usually sprayed from aircraft in the clear-cutting of forests near the Siletz River. (Rio Davidson/Lincoln County Community Rights)

NEWPORT, Ore. – The Siletz River ecosystem could take some novel legal action in an Oregon case over a measure banning aerial pesticides. In May, Lincoln County residents passed a measure outlawing the spraying of pesticides from aircraft. The measure is the first of its kind in the nation.

The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is recognized globally for its biological diversity. (Bureau of Land Management/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Over the weekend, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke visited the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, one of about two dozen national monuments whose status and borders his agency are reviewing. Zinke met with stakeholders in the region, including state Rep. Pam Marsh of Ashland.

A new report finds cleaning the Columbia River up for fish would have significant economic value for the region. (Thomas/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. -- A cleaner Columbia River could unlock even more economic potential for the Northwest, according to a new report. In Earth Economics' analysis of the Columbia River Basin, its natural value totals nearly $200 billion dollars annually in food, water, recreation, flood risk reductio

Suction dredge mining disrupts spawning and rearing areas for salmon. (Jeff T. Green/Getty Images)

SALEM, Ore. – A bipartisan group of Oregon lawmakers passed a bill Wednesday that will give salmon some relief from the pull of suction dredge mining. The practice is used to suck up gold on the riverbeds of former mining sites. Gas-powered devices do the suctioning. However, the practice

The Portland Timbers are a member of the Green Sports Alliance, which is helping teams, stadiums and fans go green. (Steve Dykes/Getty Images)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Sports reach millions of viewers each year and attract thousands of fans to every game, which means teams and athletes have a lot of influence. The Green Sports Alliance recognizes that the footprint for stadiums and arenas is big. So it's focusing on sustainable ways to pro

Oregon has committed to getting all its energy needs from renewable power sources by 2050. (Melanie Connor/GettyImages)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Utility company Portland General Electric (PGE) has suspended its efforts to get permits for two natural-gas plants, in part because of its customers' desire for renewable energy. PGE's coal-fired power plant in Boardman, Ore., is scheduled to shut down in 2020 and, while th

Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument was expanded from 65,000 to 113,000 acres under President Obama, meaning it could be subject for review under a new executive order. (Bob Wick/BLM)

ASHLAND, Ore. – President Donald Trump's executive order asking the U.S. Department of the Interior to review national monuments could put the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southern Oregon in the administration's sights. On Tuesday at the U.S. Capitol, the House Natural Resources Comm

An organizer says momentum for Saturday's march grew after the Women's March drew a large crowd in Pendleton. (Pat Hall Walters)

PENDLETON, Ore. – Marchers in cities big and small across the nation this Saturday say the evidence is clear: It's time to stand up for science. Although organizers of the March for Science are trying to steer the marches away from politics, many in the scientific community are concerned abo

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