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PNS Daily News - May 30, 2017 


We’re featuring several stories in today’s news including: Are Trump’s proposed SNAP cuts fake math? Hospital mergers are questioned around the U.S. And a native Alaskan tribe seeks help to protect sacred lands.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - TX: Sustainable Agriculture

Wild bee habitat is on the decline in many of the country's most important farmlands, according to a new report. (Derek Keats/Wikimedia Commons)

AUSTIN, Texas - Wild bee populations in the U.S. are disappearing in many of the country's most important farmlands, including West Texas, California's Central Valley, and the Great Plains and California's Central Valley according to a national study led by the University of Vermont. Taylor Ricke

Climate change is likely to have far-reaching impacts on livestock and crops throughout the world, according to a new report. Credit: USDA

AUSTIN, Texas - Climate change will have a big impact on food security across the globe, but will hit the poor and people living in tropical regions the hardest according to a new international study presented at the United Nations Climate Conference in Paris. Claudia Tebaldi, a scientist for the

Texas is stepping up efforts to make healthy, locally grown food available to its students. Credit: danny4stockphoto/iStockphoto

AUSTIN, Texas – Texas is stepping up efforts to make healthy, locally grown food available to its students. Three groups won grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) this week to strengthen a wide range of farm-to-school programs. Andrew Smiley, deputy director of the Sustaina

Fort Worth community organizations, volunteers and environmentalists are launching a pilot project to help pollinators essential to the nation's food supply. Credit: Cmackenz/iStockphoto

AUSTIN, Texas - A group of volunteers in Fort Worth is hoping a bike ride can help spark a grassroots movement to save the butterflies, bees and other pollinators that play a critical role in the nation's food chain. Jillian Jordan, the Great Seed Bomb event's founder, said bees alone contribute mo

According to a new poll, 74 percent of Texas adults say the maximum punishment for being caught with marijuana should be changed from a criminal penalty to a ticket or fine. Credit: Jan Havlicek/iStockphoto.

AUSTIN, Texas – Seventy-four percent of Texas adults say the maximum punishment for being caught with pot should be changed from a criminal penalty to a ticket or fine, according to a new poll conducted by The Texas Lyceum. Heather Fazio, Texas political director with the Marijuana Policy Pro

PHOTO: Dallas is part of a group of the nation's largest school districts adopting an antibiotic-free policy for chicken served on cafeteria menus. Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr.

DALLAS - The menu is changing - some say for the better - at some of the nation's largest schools, as chicken raised with antibiotics is getting the boot. The districts that are moving to "antibiotic-free" chicken are part of the Urban School Food Alliance. Its members include the Dallas Independen

HOUSTON - The so-called "Green School" movement is helping more Texas children discover a love of science, technology, engineering and math - thanks, in part, to a combination of federal, state and local initiatives. National Wildlife Federation science education specialist Jennifer Hammonds, who w

PALISADES, N.Y. - While the current Texas drought is the result of naturally varying conditions, climate scientists predict much more of the same in coming decades because of long-term warming trends. Texas is poised to surpass a 1956 dry spell and record its worst drought on record if high heat an

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