Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 22, 2017 


Haitian communities vow to fight Trump moves to terminate legal status; also on the rundown; an update on the trial of an activist who shut down a pipeline; a new poll shows Americans want to talk turkey not politics, on Thanksgiving; and just ahead of Black Friday - Cyber Security an emerging toy-safety concern.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Climate Change/Air Quality

Advocates for Washington's immigrant community say the state hasn't prioritized getting disaster warnings or relief information to non-English speakers. (USDA/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The large wildfires burning in Eastern Washington have prompted Gov. Jay Inslee to declare a state of emergency in 20 counties. Although this year's in-state fire season has been quiet, wildfires now threaten homes and businesses. As state agencies mobilize to help the victims, non-Englis

The Department of the Interior is trying to stop drones from entering fire zones. (Peter Linehan/flickr)

SEATTLE - Although this year's fire season has started slow compared with last year, rising temperatures in Washington state's forecast could ramp it up. The U.S. Department of the Interior said one threat to putting out fires across the west is drones. This year, drones have interfered with more th

Top Tier gasoline keeps engines 19 times cleaner than non-Top Tier gas, according to a new study. (Airman 1st Class Andrew Lee/Wikimedia Commons)

SEATTLE – Choosing the right gasoline could keep your engine cleaner and your car running longer, according to a new study from the American Automobile Association. AAA says it commissioned an independent lab to study the difference between gasoline designated Top Tier and other non-Top Tier

A federal appeals court has ruled that Washington state must repair culverts blocking salmon from swimming to upstream habitats. (Matthew_Hull/morguefile)

SEATTLE – Native American tribes in Washington state received a victory Monday from a federal appeals court that ruled the state must pay to fix fish blocking culverts. Culverts allow rivers and streams to flow underneath roadways, but can be trouble for salmon swimming upstream if the culve

In 2011, the EPA released its first-ever findings of environmental discrimination in a case of pesticide spray near a California school. (Chafer Machinery/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The Environmental Protection Agency rarely investigates complaints from minority communities that allege local environmental regulations are discriminatory. According to the Center for Public Integrity, only one of seven cases in Washington state has been accepted for investigation sinc

At full strength, a proposed coal-export terminal in Longview would ship 44 million tons of coal overseas each year. (Sam Beebe/Ecotrust)

PASCO, Wash. – Supporters and opponents are gathering in Pasco today for the final public hearing on a massive coal-export terminal in Longview. Meetings were held in Longview and Spokane last week after the release of an environmental impact study by the Washington State Department of Ecolo

Northwest forests could start to resemble subtropical forests, according to a model of climate change from scientists at Washington State University. (pixabay)

SEATTLE - In the near future, Pacific Northwesterners could look out their windows and see something more similar to the Amazon than the cold, misty forests they're used to. Based on an aggregate of climatic forecasts, researchers at Washington State University have developed a model of what the Un

Rail accidents could increase by 22 percent if improvements are not made to rail lines, according to a report on the proposed Columbia River coal terminal. (Greg Goebel/Yvcol_2b)

SEATTLE - Greenhouse-gas emissions from the proposed Millennium Bulk Terminals coal-export project in Longview would be equivalent to adding more than 600,000 cars to the road each year. That's according to a draft environmental impact study released by Cowlitz County and the Washington State Depa

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