Newscasts

PNS Daily News - July 25, 2017 


Another Obamacare repeal showdown expected in the Senate; the President’s son-in-law in the hot seat in the Russia probe; and a setback for federal immigration agents. We’re covering those stories and more on today’s rundown.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Health Issues

Veterans with pre-existing conditions could see health care costs go up under the GOP's health-care bills. (Robert Shields/Army Medicine)

SEATTLE – A new report finds nearly a half-million veterans would lose health coverage over the next decade under the GOP's health-care bills. About 1.8 million veterans rely on Medicaid, according to an analysis by the Center for American Progress. Nearly a quarter of those vets would los

Men are less likely to go to the doctor than women, but also suffer from higher rates of mortality in eight of the ten leading causes of death. (Alterfines/Pixabay)

PORT ORCHARD, Wash. – With Father's Day approaching, there's one gift every dad should get: an encouraging nudge to go to the doctor for a check-up. Men are far less likely to see their doctors than women, and in general are less aware of medical symptoms. According to the CDC, women between

The federal Summer Food Service program provides funding for children's meals while school is out. (School's Out Washington)

EVERETT, Wash. - Summer vacation is here, and while that means fun in the sun, for some it also means a lot of hungry days. Children who normally rely on free and reduced-price lunches are able to get meals through the federal Summer Food Service Program. However, the Food Resource and Action Cente

A bill in Congress could cap compensation for victims of medical error, which is the third-leading cause of death in the United States. (wp paarz/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Congress is considering a bill that could leave patients harmed by medical malpractice with big bills still left to pay, even after their day in court. Known as the Protecting Access to Care Act of 2017, the bill would cap non-economic damages for victims of medical malpractice at

Northwest tribes are fighting the proposed expansion of the TransMountian Pipeline, which would stretch from the Alberta tar sands to Puget Sound. (Stop Carbon Pollution/Flickr)

SEATTLE – The mother of all pipelines could be coming to the Northwest, and Native Americans in the region want their voices heard on the proposal. The Houston-based company, Kinder Morgan's expanded TransMountain Pipeline would stretch from the Alberta tar sands to Puget Sound and could tra

Washingtonians can prepare themselves for allergy season with over-the-counter nasal sprays and antihistamines. (cenczi/Pixabay)

SEATTLE – While the Northwest's long and rainy winter may have delayed spring, it won't keep allergy season at bay for much longer. Rainier winters than normal, such as the one Washington has just experienced, tend to tamp down pollen until warmer, drier weather moves in. Doctor Mark La Shel

Advocates for ending child abuse use the blue pinwheel during National Abuse Prevention Month to symbolize happy and healthy childhoods. (Kevin S. Abel/Flickr)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. – One in 10 people will be sexually abused before age 18, and this month, groups are raising awareness on how Washingtonians can prevent child abuse from happening. April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, an acknowledgment of the extreme burden physical and sexual abu

Colorectal cancer is the second and third leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women, respectively. (Ben-Schonewille/iStockphoto)

SEATTLE – A new report on the rising rates of colorectal cancer among young people is sparking concern and action on what to do to prevent the deadly disease. While rates for people younger than 50 have gone up in recent years, Dr. Andrew Feld, a gastroenterologist at Kaiser Permanente in W

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