Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 30, 2017 


Featured on today’s rundown; LGBTQ Americans excluded from the 2020 Census; we take a look at how Trump’s energy policies could hurt the sector’s biggest jobs creator; plus how overturning online privacy rules may especially impact immigrants.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Health Issues

Colorectal cancer is the second and third leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women, respectively. (Ben-Schonewille/iStockphoto)

SEATTLE – A new report on the rising rates of colorectal cancer among young people is sparking concern and action on what to do to prevent the deadly disease. While rates for people younger than 50 have gone up in recent years, Dr. Andrew Feld, a gastroenterologist at Kaiser Permanente in W

A grant to schools helps refugees resettle in the United States. (CDC Global/Flickr)

SEATTLE – A grant program is helping refugee students travel the long emotional distance from their homes to integrate into schools and their communities in the United States. The Office of Refugee Resettlement distributes Refugee School Impact Grants to 38 states, including Washington, and

Repeal of the of the Affordable Care Act could hurt Washington state seniors, AARP says. (Jacoblund/iStockphoto)

SEATTLE – Opposition to the GOP's proposed American Health Care Act is growing, including from organizations and even some Republican lawmakers. AARP is also speaking up against the current replacement for the Affordable Care Act. Mike Tucker, volunteer state president for AARP Washington, s

Distracted-driving deaths have risen dramatically, prompting Washington state lawmakers to introduce a bill to stop it. (Sakkawokkie/iStock)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – State lawmakers want to stop a habit that could be as harmful to Washingtonians as drinking and driving: using a cell phone while driving. Deaths from distracted driving have been on the rise in Washington state. Between 2014 and 2015, deaths rose from 130 to 171. House Bill

Midwives provide prenatal care as well as care during labor and delivery. (KManzela/Pixabay)

SEATTLE – Midwives are becoming a larger part of the picture when it comes to childbirth, growing in popularity for many mothers across the country. Ushered to the fringes during the 20th century, the most recent data from the CDC shows midwives were the lead care providers for nearly one in

Berta Alvarado (right) traveled from southeastern Washington to Washington, hoping to speak with her representatives about the future of health care. (Service Employees Int'l. Union)

OTHELLO, Wash. – As members of Congress come back to their home districts for a recess, people across the country are demanding that lawmakers hold public meetings to discuss the future of health care. Only a few lawmakers from Washington state have scheduled town hall meetings to address th

Parent caregivers testified in support of respite-care legislation in Olympia last week. (SEIU 775)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The parents of children with disabilities who need around-the-clock supervision are urging Washington state lawmakers to pass bills that would make it easier for them to take a break. HB 1322 and SB 5360 outline a bipartisan plan to cut the number of training hours needed by

Medical aid in dying for terminally ill patients, which is legal in Washington and five other states, involves consultation from a medical professional. (DarkoStojanovic/Pixabay)

SEATTLE – Advocates for end-of-life choices are concerned about President Donald Trump's pick for U.S. Supreme Court justice, Neil Gorsuch. Washington is among six states where medical aid in dying is an option for terminally ill patients at the end of their lives. In 2006, in his book "Th

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