PNS Daily Newscast - March 21, 2018 

Authorities respond to another explosion in Austin Texas. Also on our rundown: A school resource officer credited with bringing a swift end to a shooting incident at a Maryland high school, The North Carolina GOP silent on an apparent Cambrrige Analytica connection; and an Alabama Medicaid Work requirement plan called a Catch-22.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Health Issues

President Donald Trump and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee are taking different approaches on drug policy. (Chip Somodevilla/GettyImages)

SEATTLE – The Trump administration is proposing harsher penalties for drug offenses, even as states such as Washington look for other solutions. According to a report from the news outlet Axios, President Donald Trump has praised countries like the Philippines and Singapore, where drug traf

About a third of the population still has blood pressure that measures above 140 over 90, putting their health at risk. (stevepb/Flickr)

SEATTLE — February is Heart Health Month, and doctors are encouraging folks to get regular heart screenings. Recently, guidelines for blood pressure targets have been revised, eliminating the category of prehypertension and suggesting that patients be treated when their blood pressure is abo

Providers prescribe antibiotics too often, costing patients unnecessarily, according to a new report. (oliver.dodd/Flickr)

SEATTLE — In a single year, more than 600,000 Washingtonians underwent treatment they didn't need, according to a new analysis. In the Washington Health Alliance report First, Do No Harm: Calculating Health Care Waste in Washington State, researchers found people spent more than $280 million

Gov. Jay Inslee has rejected an oil terminal that would have sent 360,000 barrels of oil a day through the Columbia River Gorge. (Kat Holmes/Washington Environmental Council)

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Gov. Jay Inslee has delivered the final blow in the long battle over a proposed oil terminal in Vancouver. On Monday, Inslee agreed with the recommendation of the Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC), which voted unanimously at the end of last year to reject the

More than 800,000 Washingtonians are family caregivers. (StockSnap/Pixabay)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — With Washingtonians aging rapidly, how will the state provide long-term care? Many groups believe the bipartisan legislation known as the Long-Term Care Trust Act is one solution. The novel program would provide long-term care insurance through a payroll deduction of about 0

The House Judiciary Committee in Olympia is scheduled to vote Wednesday on a bill reforming wrongful death claims for parents. (Steve Voght/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Washington is one of only three states where the parents of children age 18 and older can't file a wrongful death claim unless they prove financial dependence on their children. Bills in the state's House and Senate aim to change that. In 2016, Kara Caicedo's sister went t

Frequent and thorough hand washing is critical to prevent the spread of viruses like the flu. (gentle07/Pixabay)

SEATTLE – How sick is sick enough to stay home from school or work? With so many obligations, the decision can be tough, but it's also vitally important during flu season. Already, 20 people have died from the flu in Washington state this season, according to health officials. Dr. Angie

About 52,000 children in Washington state get some funding for health coverage through CHIP, which is known as Apple Health for Kids. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – A last-minute deal in Congress to provide short-term funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program hasn't done much to alleviate stress for states and parents going into the new year. CHIP is one of the main funding streams, along with Medicaid and state funding, for Washingt

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