PNS Daily Newscast - March 21, 2018 

Public News Service UPDATE: the Austin bomber blows himself up; also on the rundown a school resource officer credited with saving lives; the North Carolina GOP Silent on an apparent Cambridge Analytica connection; and an Alabama Medicaid Work requirement plan called a Catch-22.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Livable Wages/Working Families

Community and technical college faculty were the only public-education employees barred from bargaining locally on pay before this legislative session. (

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Community and technical college faculty scored a big win during this year's legislative session. Lawmakers passed Engrossed House Bill 1237 to allow faculty at these colleges to negotiate local wage increases through collective bargaining. They were the only public-education

A trade war could hurt the ports in Washington, which are dependent both on imports and exports. (James Brooks/Flickr)

SEATTLE – President Donald Trump's tariff announcement has raised fears of trade wars that could hurt Washington state's economy. With as many as 40 percent of jobs in the Evergreen State dependent on foreign trade, worries abound that a backlash could come in the form of retaliatory tariffs

Public-employee unions in Washington state could take a financial hit if the U.S. Supreme Court sides with an Illinois worker in his case against AFSCME. (WFSE)

SEATTLE – Public employee union members in Washington state will be closely watching the U.S. Supreme Court case Janus v. AFSCME on Monday. Greg Devereux, executive director of the Washington Federation of State Employees (WFSE), says if justices side with Illinois worker Mark Janus, it woul

Drivers for ride-sharing companies such as Uber and Lyft are hitting traffic when they push for more protections, a new report finds. (SounderBruce/Flickr)

SEATTLE — Ride-sharing companies such as Uber and Lyft have been a big boon for folks trying to get around town, but a new report says these companies are running over local democracy. The National Employment Law Project's "Uber State Interference" report details how transportation network c

More than 80 percent of credit unions provide free checking, according to a survey. (redspotted/Flickr)

SEATTLE – While free checking may no longer be available at Bank of America and other big banks, some financial institutions still offer this service without charge. Credit unions are touting their ability to provide free financial services to their members. Morgan Cole, a public relations s

Providers prescribe antibiotics too often, costing patients unnecessarily, according to a new report. (oliver.dodd/Flickr)

SEATTLE — In a single year, more than 600,000 Washingtonians underwent treatment they didn't need, according to a new analysis. In the Washington Health Alliance report First, Do No Harm: Calculating Health Care Waste in Washington State, researchers found people spent more than $280 million

The 1968 sanitation workers' strike in Memphis attracted the attention of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Union members across the country are honoring two sanitation workers killed in Memphis 50 years ago today with a moment of silence. Leading up to the deaths of Echol Cole and Robert Walker, workers had complained about unsafe conditions, but were ignored. Their deaths led to

The Legislature is considering a bill that would expand eligibility for the state's pre-K program. (Washington State House Republicans/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The marchers may be little, but their cause is not. Toddlers and their parents are gathering in Olympia Wednesday to rally for their education. Childhood learning advocates want greater access and more investment in the state's pre-K program, known as the Early Childhood E

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