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PNS Weekend Newscast - August 19th, 2017 


Here's what we're covering: President Trump got rid of his campaign adviser, health experts are looking into who would be hurt most from climate change, and kids in one state are getting more help dealing with trauma.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Livable Wages/Working Families

Farmworkers on Sarbanand Farms say they discovered their work visas expired a month ago. (Community to Community Development)

SUMAS, Wash. - Farmworkers and community members are demanding accountability from Sarbanand Farms in Whatcom County, after a worker died there over the weekend. Workers say Honesto Silva Ibarra complained to his employer about feeling ill before he collapsed in the fields last week. Ibarra took hi

Gov. Jay Inslee at his last contract signing session with the state worker's union in 2015. (Laura Reisdorph/Washington Federation of State Employees)

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- Washington state workers receive recognition for their hard work today as Gov. Jay Inslee signs the contracts negotiated by their union last year. Lawmakers spent two special sessions working on a budget deal before finally agreeing to give state employees a 6 percent increase in

Washington lost more than 16-hundred child-care providers over the past six years, according to a report. (Seattle Parks/Flickr)

DES MOINES, Wash. – With kids out of school for summer vacation, working parents face the higher seasonal costs of child care. In Washington state, care for a child younger than four can range from $8,000 to nearly $16,000 a year, which is about the same as in-state tuition for a public colleg

Retailers stole about $15 billion from their employees each year between 2013 and 2015, according to a new report. (torbakhopper/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Retail employers are stealing as much from their employees as shoplifters are stealing from their stores, according to a new report. The progressive policy organization Demos compared minimum-wage theft data from the Economic Policy Institute and shoplifting data from the Global Reta

The ballooning cost of housing could also be fueling the rise in homelessness across Washington state. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

SEATTLE -- The door to even modest housing is shut to Washingtonians working low-income jobs, according to a new report. The National Low Income Housing Coalition's annual study, called "Out of Reach: The Rising Cost of Housing," provides data by state on the widening gap between what workers make

State lawmakers have started their second special session in Olympia. (Washington State House Republicans)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The seemingly never-ending budget talks in Olympia have become much more dire for thousands of the state's employees. Friday, the state budget office formally notified AFSCME, the union that represents Washington state employees, that workers could be temporarily laid off if

Uncertain how education will be funded in Washington state, school administrators say they typically plan for the worst-case scenario. (wsilver/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The clock is ticking again this year for the Washington State Legislature to figure out how to address the Supreme Court's McCleary decision that requires the state to properly fund schools. As legislators hammer out details behind closed doors in a special session, what do

May Day rallies across the country are expected to be ramped up this year in opposition to the Trump administration. (Chuck Taylor/Flickr)

PASCO, Wash. -- Today is May Day, and Washingtonians are rallying with people across the country in support of laborers and immigrant communities. Otherwise known as International Workers' Day, May Day now is also associated with immigrants' rights. The Tri-Cities area has been planning May Day pr

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