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PNS Daily News - May 24, 2017 


We’re featuring stories from around the globe including: British officials search for answers in the wake of a deadly attack; the former head of the CIA weighs-in on the Russia probe; and proposed cuts in President Trump’s budget plan raise serious concerns.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Rural/Farming

Proposed cuts to Puget Sound restoration could hurt Washington's shellfish industry. (Ingrid Taylar/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Trump Administration has proposed cutting Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funding for Puget Sound restoration by 93 percent, and that could be bad news for businesses that rely on the continued water cleanup efforts. Funding would drop from $28 million to $2 million.

Nurses in rural Washington could be disproportionately hurt by repeal of the Affordable Care Act, compared with those who work in urban areas. (janeyhenning/Flickr)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. - As debate in the nation's capital continues over repealing the Affordable Care Act and ending Medicaid expansion, rural Washington is bracing for the effects of repeal. Rural counties face a different set of health-care challenges than do urban areas, and could be disproportiona

Warmer winters in the Northwest due to climate change could mean more damage from species such as pine beetle. (Don Becker/U.S. Geological Survey)

SEATTLE – Many of the effects of climate change scientists did not expect to happen for decades into the future are happening now. According to a new study in the journal Science, researchers found that every ecosystem on Earth is being impacted by a warming globe, from the genetic level up.

Researchers and others believe breaching the four Lower Snake River dams could give Puget Sound orcas more fish to feed on. (Seabamirum/Flickr)

SPOKANE, Wash. – As the public weighs in today in Spokane on the future of the Lower Snake River dams, researchers are calling for their removal in order to save Puget Sound orcas. In October, two members of the J pod of Southern Resident killer whales died, and scientists at the Center for

The Oso landslide in 2014 killed 43 people in northwest Washington. (Jonathan Godt/USGS)

SEATTLE – The Oso landslide tragedy killed 43 people more than two-and-a-half years ago, but the cause of that landslide has never been cleared up. David Montgomery, professor of geomorphology at the University of Washington, said there's no evidence logging played a role in the slide, althou

Advocates for Washington's immigrant community say the state hasn't prioritized getting disaster warnings or relief information to non-English speakers. (USDA/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The large wildfires burning in Eastern Washington have prompted Gov. Jay Inslee to declare a state of emergency in 20 counties. Although this year's in-state fire season has been quiet, wildfires now threaten homes and businesses. As state agencies mobilize to help the victims, non-Englis

A new study says 63 percent of Washington's agricultural workers are immigrants. (Mahalie Stackpole/Flickr)

SEATTLE - Immigrants are playing crucial roles in Washington State's economy, according to a new study. The Partnership for a New American Economy report shows the state's immigrant population of nearly one-million is vital to the agricultural and technology sectors. For instance, 45 percent of sof

Familias Unidas por la Justicia has staged six walkouts in the last three years on Sakuma Brothers' Berry Farm. (Community to Community)

BURLINGTON, Wash. - About 180 farmworkers staged a walkout from Sakuma Brothers Berry Farm yesterday to protest wages and working conditions. The main demand of the union Familias Unidas por la Justicia (Families United for Justice) is an 11-cent increase for each pound of strawberries workers pi

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