PNS Daily Newscast - March 21, 2018 

Authorities respond to another explosion in Austin Texas. Also on our rundown: A school resource officer credited with bringing a swift end to a shooting incident at a Maryland high school, The North Carolina GOP silent on an apparent Cambrrige Analytica connection; and an Alabama Medicaid Work requirement plan called a Catch-22.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Budget Policy & Priorities

The Legislature passed a plethora of affordable housing solutions this session, including $100 million in the Biennial Capital Budget for Housing Trust Fund. (fumigene/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Advocates fighting homelessness are notching some major wins from the Washington state Legislature. With the session now over, groups are tallying their victories over the affordable housing and homelessness crisis gripping the state. Michele Thomas, director of policy and a

The Legislature is considering a bill that would expand eligibility for the state's pre-K program. (Washington State House Republicans/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The marchers may be little, but their cause is not. Toddlers and their parents are gathering in Olympia Wednesday to rally for their education. Childhood learning advocates want greater access and more investment in the state's pre-K program, known as the Early Childhood E

Credit union advocates are in Olympia for their annual Capitol day. (Northwest Credit Union Association)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Credit union advocates are in Olympia Wednesday calling for reform to public funding in Washington state. This year, these institutions are pushing for a bill that would lift the $250,000 cap on government agencies' deposits into credit unions. Paula Sardinas, vice preside

A hearing is scheduled today on a bill that could help more 80 percent of social workers with student debt repay their loans. (Steve Voght/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — The annual turnover rate for children’s services social workers is more than 20 percent in Washington state. Could a bill to relieve them of their student loan debt help retention and recruitment? The state Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee is

Recidivism rates are higher for people who aren't able to find a job after they're released from prison. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – A bill that would help formerly incarcerated Washingtonians get a fairer chance at employment is scheduled for a public hearing Wednesday. The Fair Chance Act would "ban the box" – that is, prevent employers from asking about a person's criminal background until after

Washington and Colorado were the first states to legalize recreational marijuana use. (Global Panorama/Flickr)

SEATTLE – A move on Thursday signals what could be the start of a federal crackdown on marijuana. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has announced he will rescind the so-called Cole Memo, an Obama-era document that de-prioritized prosecution of cannabis laws. Washington and Colorado were the fir

About 52,000 children in Washington state get some funding for health coverage through CHIP, which is known as Apple Health for Kids. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – A last-minute deal in Congress to provide short-term funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program hasn't done much to alleviate stress for states and parents going into the new year. CHIP is one of the main funding streams, along with Medicaid and state funding, for Washingt

Northwest tribes oppose the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, which could increase oil tanker traffic in the Strait of Juan de Fuca sevenfold. (Mark Klotz/Flickr)

SEATTLE – This year, Native tribes have been at the forefront of opposition against expanding oil and gas transport in the Northwest. They say the latest threat to the environment and their way of life is the Trans Mountain Pipeline through British Columbia – and Houston-based Kinder M

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